Primary science teaching resources on light

Hello teachers! Our newest resources are available to download, and they make the perfect accompaniment to the awesome Eye Spy edition of Whizz Pop Bang.

Year 6 and P7: Make a Periscope Lesson Pack

Make a periscope science resource pack from Whizz Pop Bang
Whizz Pop Bang investigation pack for year 6 and P7,
linking to the ‘light’ and ‘vibration and waves’

In this light investigation lesson pack, pupils will discover how light travels in straight lines and reflects off objects so we can see them. Pupils will learn about the different parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, pupil, retina and iris. Using mirrors and a kitchen roll, pupils will investigate light by building a simple periscope.

This downloadable pack includes:

  • A lesson plan, complete with top tips for setting up the activity
  • Printable instructions for the activity
  • A PowerPoint presentation that explains how we see
  • A writing frame for an explanation text with a diagram of the eye, to be used in English lessons
  • Three speedy science activities

Year 6 and P7: Bionic Eye Interview Reading Comprehension

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a biomedical engineer

This non-fiction Bionic Eye Interview text links to the ‘light’ and ‘vibrations and waves’ topics for year 6 and P7. The interview with Gregg Suaning, a Professor of Biomedical Engineering, explains how his team is developing a bionic eye called Phoenix99 that could help people who have lost their sight to see again.

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • Reading comprehension question sheet
  • An answer sheet including the objective for each question, which is taken from the reading National Curriculum

This historical scientist biography text for year 6 and P7, linking to the topics *light* and *vibrations and waves*, describes how Patricia Bath invented the ‘Laserphaco Probe’. This invention uses lasers to help break up and remove cataracts through a cut in the eye just 1 mm long. It has been used by eye doctors around the world.


Year 6 and P7: Historical Scientist Patricia Bath Reading Comprehension

Whizz Pop Bang reading pack on historical scientist Patricia Bath

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • A reading comprehension question sheet
  • An answer sheet including the objective for each question, which is taken from the reading national curriculum

Inside this eye-poppingly exciting edition of Whizz Pop Bang you’ll find all sorts of ways to trick your eyes!

You’ll meet a cheetah – they’re spotted, speedy and have super-sharp sight – and learn how creatures who live in the dark sense their surroundings.

You can also discover how microscopes work and have a go at making some fantastic 3D glasses.

Not yet a subscriber to our downloadable teaching resources?

Teacher’s reviews for Whizz Pop Bang!

The Whizz Pop Bang Pee Power issue is proving a big hit! We’re loving this review posted by a teacher on facebook…

“I told one of my classes of girls that following the very popular issue all about pooh the latest issue is all about wee. They were very excited. Where but in a science lesson can children talk about wee and pooh? A few months ago we were testing acids and alkalis using pH paper and I mentioned that a couple of years ago one girl tested her urine. Quite a few hands went up to volunteer to do the same, so of course I let a couple of girls go off to the loo with plastic cups. And instructions not to spill them on the way back! My girls love WPB; they can read them if they finish their science early or if we have a few minutes. Most popular with 6 year olds for some reason!”

Madeleine Holmes

Looking for ways to build girls’ confidence in science?

“The positive work that Whizz Pop Bang does to challenge and break down gender stereotypes has really hit a chord with the girls in our school. They love everything about the magazine, from its gender balanced covers to the articles and practical ideas that appeal to them and especially the features on contemporary and historical female scientists and engineers.

Every issue features female scientists discussing their jobs, and there’s rarely a month goes by without girls in my class asking about how you get in to engineering, or become a fossil hunter. The content and the presentation are really helping to open primary school-aged girls’ eyes to the huge variety of careers they could follow and helping them realise that there is no such thing as a job women can’t do!

The focus on historical scientific figures such as Agnes Arber, Florence Nightingale and Rachel Carson has encouraged girls in my class to engage in independent research into significant female scientists of the past and their contributions. It’s also sparked debates in class about why, historically, there are so few prominent women in scientific fields and, most importantly, what they want to do to change this. Whizz Pop Bang has inspired many of the girls in our school to think about and consider careers that they would never have been aware of otherwise. We have seen a marked increase in girl’s interest in, and engagement with, STEM subjects. This year our science club was 70% girls and 8 out of 12 of our Science Lab Technicians were girls.”

Paul Tyler, Mearns Primary School, Glasgow

Supporting upper KS2 with SATS…

“Using Whizz Pop Bang has revitalized our science teaching. The quality of the resources are first class and particularly support cross curricular links through the reading comprehension activities. We have found these to be particularly useful at the upper end of KS2 where science can be used as a vehicle to support SATs, making use of skills of inference and deduction based on relevant scientific topics. In addition the planning offers exciting practical ideas, particularly useful to teachers who are not scientific specialists. The children absolutely love carrying out the real-life experiments.”
Sally Cowell, Head teacher at Shaw Ridge Primary school, Swindon

Science ideas for gifted and talented groups

“I originally ordered Whizz Pop Bang for my then 7 year old. At the time, I was a microbiologist with a real passion for science and wanted my children to have the same passion and natural curiosity. Following the birth of my second child, I retrained as a primary school teacher, specifically Early Years. My passion for science never left me and I like to use science investigations with my class of 4 and 5 year olds to promote cross curricular learning and natural curiosity. I also run the Gifted and Talented group for which I also use ideas and investigations from Whizz Pop Bang. Recently we made the straw DNA model. The children loved it. The investigations can be tailored to any age group from 4 – 12. I absolutely love it.”

Mrs Sara Thomas, Holy Rosary Catholic Primary School, Burton upon Trent


Find out how Whizz Pop Bang can transform science in your school with our monthly magazines, and new downloadable science and reading resources! Visit our schools page for more info and to download a free sample pack.

EYE SPY! A close-up look at the science of sight


Inside this issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine you’ll find all sorts of ways to trick your eyes, learn how microscopes work and you can even have a go at making some fantastic 3D glasses.

LEARN HOW TO WRITE YOUR NAME IN BRAILLE: Ever wondered how blind people read braille? In this issue we teach you the braille alphabet so you can learn how to write your name. How long will it take you to remember the pattern of dots that create the letters in your name?

YOU WON’T BELIEVE YOUR EYES! Learn how eyes work, then play some tricks on your peepers with our speedy science activities.

SILLY SCIENCE: How do creatures who live in the dark sense their surroundings? Find out about six creatures who live in the dark and have developed some amazing ways to sense their environments, find food and avoid danger.

HOW STUFF WORKS: Take a close look inside a microscope, and enter the competition to win a pocket microscope!

SENSATIONAL SCIENTISTS: Read all about Patricia Bath’s medical inventions and how they’ve restored sight to thousands of people.

Loads of awesome eye-deas to keep your budding young scientists entertained! Visit our online shop to buy this issue for just £3.99 with FREE UK delivery. Got a question about Whizz Pop Bang or subscribing? Check out our FAQs or get in touch by emailing our friendly customer services team: hello@whizzpopbang.com

British Science Week competition!

To celebrate Science Week 2019 we’re running a competition with John Adams, to win one of these cool science kits! To enter simply tell us which type of science, or STEM topic your child loves most, enter your answer in the box below.

Competition closes at midnight on Sunday 17th March. Three lucky winners will receive one of these science kits: Mission to Mars, Thinking Time or Beating Heart. Winners will be chosen at random, and prizes will be sent out buy John Adams.

WIN! Brilliant Ideas from Wonderful Women

It’s International Women’s Day 2019 and to celebrate we’ve got three copies of this super cool book to give away! To enter this competition simply answer this question…

Which famous female scientist discovered that Earth has an inner core, as well as a mantle and outer core? 
1. Inge Lehmann
2. Katherine Johnson
3. Agnes Arber

Answer in the comments box below by midnight on Sunday 10/3/19 👇🏾
(Hint: the answer is in the QUAKE RATTLE AND ROLL issue of Whizz Pop Bang!)

SPECTACULAR SCIENCE: Glass Frog Heartbeat

These extraordinary tree-dwelling frogs live mostly in tropical areas of Central and South America. Most are tiny, ranging in size from 3 cm to 7.5 cm. They are usually green in colour, except for their undersides, where the skin is transparent. This makes it easy to see their internal organs, including their beating hearts!


Unlike tree frogs, glass frogs have forward-facing eyes. They have excellent eyesight for hunting prey at night.

Solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie performing at the Olympic Games 2012

In our Christmas 2018 issue, Jingle Bell Rock, we interview solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie who lost her hearing at the age of eight. Here she is playing the Aluphone at the Olympic Games opening ceremony in 2012…

To read the interview and find out more about Evelyn and how she plays music by feeling vibrations, buy this issue from our online shop for £3.99 with free UK delivery.

10 Awesomely Amazing Musical Instruments!

Inside the Christmas Jingle Bell Rock issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, we discover 10 awesomely amazing musical instruments; from the bizarre instruments made of fruit and vegetables, to this rather magical instrument that is played without even touching it… the theremin.

The theremin is a musical instrument that is played without being touched. Err, what? How does that work?! The electronic instrument uses an electromagnetic field around two antenna, and the musician disrupts this field with their hands to create a spooky sound. Watch this video of Ennio Morricone to discover the mysterious sounds this instrument can make 👇🏾

To see all the weird and wonderful musical instruments featured in this issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, order from our online shop. Magazines cost just £3.99 with FREE UK delivery.

Listen to our exclusive interview with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!

How lucky are we to get not one, but two interviews with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!!!!! Our editor Tammy chatted to Tim on the phone, asking him lots of probing questions from curious Whizz Pop Bang readers (see the list of questions below).

Listen to the full interview, complete with NASA footage and photos here 👇🏾

Enjoy space-lovers!

The questions Whizz Pop Bang readers asked Tim:

  1. What did it feel like taking off in a rocket?
  2. Do your ears pop during take-off like they do on a plane?
  3. How long does it take to get into space?
  4. How long does it take to actually get to the space station?
  5. Do you have to stay put in the capsule for the whole journey? And what happens if you need the loo?
  6. What does it feel like to be weightless?
  7. What’s it like seeing Earth from space?
  8. Does seeing Earth make you feel differently about the fragility of the environment?
  9. What was your scariest moment in space?
  10. Is it cold on a spacewalk?
  11. Why does the Soyuz craft look so black and battered now?
  12. Did it hurt when you landed?
  13. What was it like coming back to Earth?
  14. What do you miss most when you’re in space?
  15. Where would you most like to travel to in space?
  16. Do you think flights to Mars will ever happen?
  17. Do you think we will ever find extra-terrestrial life?
  18. What advice do you have for budding space scientists?

Photo and video credits Tim Peake, NASA, ESA, Victor Zelentsov and Scott Kelly.

WIN! Max Einstein The Genius Experiment

Max Einstein the genius experiment book

When it comes to brains, there’s one brain in particular that we associate with brilliance… and that’s scientist Albert Einstein’s. To accompany the Brilliant Brains issue of Whizz Pop Bang, we’ve got five copies of this brand new book ‘Max Einstein The Genius Experiment’ to give away!

To enter simply answer this question in the comments box below:

Where are bits of Albert Einstein’s brain?
a) In a secret safe
b) In space
c) In a US museum

Hint: find the answer in the Brilliant Brains, issue 38 of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Deadline to enter is 30/9/18

Notes from the publisher:

James Patterson has teamed up with the world’s most famous genius to entertain and inspire a generation of children – with the first and only kids’ book series officially approved by the Albert Einstein Archives.

Twelve-year-old orphan Max Einstein is not your typical genius. Max hacks the computer system at NYU in order to attend college courses (even though she hates tests), builds homemade inventions to help the homeless, and plays speed chess in the park. Her not-so-normal life is crazy but predictable until…

Max is recruited by a mysterious organisation! Their mission: solve some of the world’s toughest problems using science. She’s helped by a diverse group of young geniuses from around the globe as they invent new ways to power the farthest reaches of the planet. But that’s only if the sinister outfit known only as The Corporation doesn’t get to her first…

Recommended age: 9 – 14yrs