Solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie performing at the Olympic Games 2012

In our Christmas 2018 issue, Jingle Bell Rock, we interview solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie who lost her hearing at the age of eight. Here she is playing the Aluphone at the Olympic Games opening ceremony in 2012…

To read the interview and find out more about Evelyn and how she plays music by feeling vibrations, buy this issue from our online shop for £3.99 with free UK delivery.

10 Awesomely Amazing Musical Instruments!

Inside the Christmas Jingle Bell Rock issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, we discover 10 awesomely amazing musical instruments; from the bizarre instruments made of fruit and vegetables, to this rather magical instrument that is played without even touching it… the theremin.

The theremin is a musical instrument that is played without being touched. Err, what? How does that work?! The electronic instrument uses an electromagnetic field around two antenna, and the musician disrupts this field with their hands to create a spooky sound. Watch this video of Ennio Morricone to discover the mysterious sounds this instrument can make 👇🏾

To see all the weird and wonderful musical instruments featured in this issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, order from our online shop. Magazines cost just £3.99 with FREE UK delivery.

Listen to our exclusive interview with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!

How lucky are we to get not one, but two interviews with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!!!!! Our editor Tammy chatted to Tim on the phone, asking him lots of probing questions from curious Whizz Pop Bang readers (see the list of questions below).

Listen to the full interview, complete with NASA footage and photos here 👇🏾

Enjoy space-lovers!

The questions Whizz Pop Bang readers asked Tim:

  1. What did it feel like taking off in a rocket?
  2. Do your ears pop during take-off like they do on a plane?
  3. How long does it take to get into space?
  4. How long does it take to actually get to the space station?
  5. Do you have to stay put in the capsule for the whole journey? And what happens if you need the loo?
  6. What does it feel like to be weightless?
  7. What’s it like seeing Earth from space?
  8. Does seeing Earth make you feel differently about the fragility of the environment?
  9. What was your scariest moment in space?
  10. Is it cold on a spacewalk?
  11. Why does the Soyuz craft look so black and battered now?
  12. Did it hurt when you landed?
  13. What was it like coming back to Earth?
  14. What do you miss most when you’re in space?
  15. Where would you most like to travel to in space?
  16. Do you think flights to Mars will ever happen?
  17. Do you think we will ever find extra-terrestrial life?
  18. What advice do you have for budding space scientists?

Photo and video credits Tim Peake, NASA, ESA, Victor Zelentsov and Scott Kelly.

WIN! Max Einstein The Genius Experiment

Max Einstein the genius experiment book

When it comes to brains, there’s one brain in particular that we associate with brilliance… and that’s scientist Albert Einstein’s. To accompany the Brilliant Brains issue of Whizz Pop Bang, we’ve got five copies of this brand new book ‘Max Einstein The Genius Experiment’ to give away!

To enter simply answer this question in the comments box below:

Where are bits of Albert Einstein’s brain?
a) In a secret safe
b) In space
c) In a US museum

Hint: find the answer in the Brilliant Brains, issue 38 of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Deadline to enter is 30/9/18

Notes from the publisher:

James Patterson has teamed up with the world’s most famous genius to entertain and inspire a generation of children – with the first and only kids’ book series officially approved by the Albert Einstein Archives.

Twelve-year-old orphan Max Einstein is not your typical genius. Max hacks the computer system at NYU in order to attend college courses (even though she hates tests), builds homemade inventions to help the homeless, and plays speed chess in the park. Her not-so-normal life is crazy but predictable until…

Max is recruited by a mysterious organisation! Their mission: solve some of the world’s toughest problems using science. She’s helped by a diverse group of young geniuses from around the globe as they invent new ways to power the farthest reaches of the planet. But that’s only if the sinister outfit known only as The Corporation doesn’t get to her first…

Recommended age: 9 – 14yrs

whizz pop bang science magazine paper straw planes

Geometric paper straw planes!

How do you make a triangle fly? Will a square take to the air? Create your own paper straw flying machines and put them to the test with the SKY HIGH SCIENCE issue of Whizz Pop Bang! You’ll find everything you need inside issue 36 of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine, order a copy for just £3.75 with FREE UK delivery here.

Packed full of outdoor science activities for girls and boys over the summer holidays – ditch the screens and find out how planes fly!

 

what makes something fly

Take off this summer with our Sky High Science issue!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Sky high science

Wouldn’t it be amazing to fly like a bird? Or how do you fancy fluttering like a butterfly, or even soaring like a snake?! There are all sorts of flying phenomena to discover this issue. Have a go at making your own stunt plane, investigating different designs of straw planes and testing aerofoils. We interview Palaeontologist Liz Martin-Silverstone to ask her how on earth the giant pterosaurs were able to fly, plus we find out how drones work, and answer the question on lots of people’s minds… just how do planes fly???

Buy this issue here and fill your summer holidays with awesome science fun!! ? ✈ ?

Nikita Hari photo

Whizz Pop Bang interviews with science heroes!

Whizz Pop Bang Interview with Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari

Each month we interview a SCIENCE HERO to find out what real scientists do in their jobs. This is where we ensure we have a real mix of male and female scientists to inspire girls and boys, and particularly showcase women in STEM roles. Breaking down gender stereotypes is an important part of Whizz Pop Bang magazine as we strive for a future of equality.

Many of the scientists we interview are happy to be contacted by readers who have their own questions, a great opportunity to chat to real scientists! We love this tweet from Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari who’s passionate about inspiring kids into science, especially girls…

Inspiring tweet from Nikita Hari electrical engineer

 

Are your kids super curious, always asking questions and exploring new ideas? Help them to nurture their natural curiosity with Whizz Pop Bang! Here’s a list of the 35 scientists we’ve interviewed to date:

Issue 1: Beccy Smith, Chocolate scientist

Issue 2: Karen Ladenheim, Robotics scientist, Stanford University

Issue 3: Lynn Whitfield, Bat ecologist

Issue 4: Dr Steve Brusatte, Palaeontologist, Edinburgh University

Issue 5: Rob Lambert, Antarctic explorer and polar scientist

Issue 6: Tim Peake, Astronaut

Issue 7: Susan Cheyne, Conservation biologist (orangutans)

Issue 8: Misha Lotto, young scientist, Blackawton Bees Project

Issue 9: Josie Campbell, Vet

Issue 10: Shane Cronin, Volcanologist (New Zealand)

Issue 11: Jennifer Andon, Entomologist

Issue 12: Dr Maddalena Bearsi, Marine biologist

Issue 13: Prof Robert Winston, Medical scientist, Imperial College

Issue 14: Sarah Shelley, Fossil hunter

Issue 15: Helen Czerski, Bubble scientist

Issue 16: Abbie Hutty, Mars Rover engineer

Issue 17: Lara Aknin, Psychology professor (gift-giving)

Issue 18: Emma Burke, Penguin aquarist

Issue 19: Ian Gilby, Primatologist, Tanzania

Issue 20: Caoimhe Doyle, Foley Artist, sound effect engineer

Issue 21: Amy Dejong, Food scientist, University of Wisconsin

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a nanotechnologist

Issue 22: Payton Barnwell, Nanotechnologist, Florida Polytechnic Uni

Issue 23: Dave Goulson, Bumblebee biologist

Issue 24: Huw James, Science adventurer

Issue 25: Alex Hildred, Maritime archaeologist

Issue 26: Cierra Martin, Seed guardian

Issue 27: Toby Gemmill, Orthopaedic vet

Issue 28: Dr Sheyna, Martian (sort of!)

Issue 29: Richard Stammers, Visual effects artist

Issue 30: Andres Ruzo, Geothermal Scientist

Issue 31: Lisa Elser, Gem cutter

Issue 32: Pratap Pullammanappallil, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida, USA 

Issue 33: Dr Nicola Rooney, Research Fellow in the Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group at the University of Bristol

Issue 34: Nikita Hari, Electrical Engineer

Issue 35: Barry Drust, Professor of Exercise Physiology

Whizz Pop Bang magazine has helped to inspire lots of girls and boys to want to be scientists when they grow up! To buy a back issue (for just £3.75 inc UK delivery) visit our back issues shop or you can sign up for monthly magazines by post – simply subscribe online.

Win this icon

WIN! The Story of Inventions by Anna Claybourne and Adam Larkum

Competition time!

We’ve got five copies of The Story of Inventions to giveaway! Who invented the toilet, umbrella and diving suits? Find out in this fascinating book of inventions…

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine competition to win the story of inventions book

To enter simply answer this question in the comment box below:

Who created the world’s first electric motor?

a) Michael Faraday

b) Michael Magnet

c) Michael Field

Deadline to enter is midnight on 31st May 2018.

By entering this competition you agree to our terms and conditions. Thanks to Usborne Books for supplying the prizes.

dinosaur-tracks-scotland

How does it feel to find a giant dino footprint? We talk to paleontologist Steve Brusatte to find out!

Did you hear about the huge dinosaur footprints discovered on the Scottish coast this week? We ask Steve Brusatte some very important questions about this awesome discovery…

Paleontologist Dr Steve Brusatte at the dinosaur footprint site on the Isle of Skye
Paleontologist Dr Steve Brusatte at the dinosaur footprint site on the Isle of Skye 

We’re lucky to have Steve on the Whizz Pop Bang boffin team (our panel of expert scientists who advise us on the latest scientific developments), so we asked him a few questions about the latest dinosaur print to be discovered on the Isle of Skye.

1. Are there words to describe just how exciting it feels to discover these tracks?

 It was a fantabulotastic feeling. I think that’s the best way I can try to put it into words! Because the moment of discovery is magical. When you find something that no human has ever seen before, something from hundreds of millions of years ago. It was actually one of my students who discovered these tracks. Davide Foffa is his name; he’s a PhD student, from Italy. I was very proud that my student found something so amazing!
davide foffa at footprint site
Davide Foffa, one of my students who actually discovered these tracks
2. Do you have a special dino discovery high five with your team?!
No! Although maybe I should invent one. Any ideas?
3.  If people want to go and visit the Isle of Skye can they see the foot print? Can they put their own foot inside the print?
Yes they can, although the tracks are located at a protected site, so they can’t be tampered with. If you go and see them, be careful not to damage them. They’ve lasted for 170 million years and we want them to last for a long time more. It is an amazing thing to put your foot inside a dinosaur track. It gives you a sense of just how big these dinosaurs were! The biggest tracks are 70 centimeters across, so about the size of a car tyre!

Want to know more about discovering dinosaurs? Order the Fossil Frenzy issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine and read all about how to find a dinosaur with Steve Brusatte! Visit our online shop to buy this issue for just £3.75 (free UK postage).

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids Fossil Frenzy cover
Whizz Pop Bang science magazine Issue 14 dinosaur hunting with paleontologist Steve Brusatte
Whizz Pop Bang science magazine issue 14: Fossil Frenzy
Whizz POp Bang science magazine for kids edible poo_5

Blurghhh it’s edible poo!

We’ve been inundated with your photos of edible poo!!!! The PLOP-TASTIC poo issue has been the most popular issue of Whizz Pop Bang, proving (as if any parent or teacher needed proof) that kids really do love talking about poo!

WARNING! DO NOT look at these photos whilst eating, or if you’re easily offended by the sight of very realistic poo on a plate…

Intrigued about the ingredients for edible poo? Buy the PLOP-TASTIC poo issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine from our back issues shop and let the poo-themed fun begin!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine poo issue