EASY SCIENCE FOR KIDS: Decomposing experiment + competition to win PATCH bamboo plasters!

Are you looking for free experiments for kids? Here’s an easy science experiment that doesn’t need any special materials or skills, just bags of curiosity…

This decomposing experiment is a great way to show composting in action. If you’re looking for STEM activities for primary school or home school science lessons about living things and habitats, this investigation is a winner!

Keep scrolling to be in with a chance of winning some awesome, earth-friendly prizes, too!

Decomposing experiment for kids

Rotting Rubbish decomposing experiment from Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

For this experiment you will need:

  • Two jam jars of the same size
  • Two pieces of old fabric
  • Two elastic bands
  • Compost or soil
  • Finely chopped banana or other fruit
  • Small pieces of plastic or polystyrene

The decomposing experiment

  1. Set up the experiment as shown. Each jar should contain the same depth of compost.
  2. Sprinkle a few drops of water over the fruit and plastic.
  3. Leave the experiment for at least five days, noting any changes in the jars.

You should find the fruit will have started to rot but the plastic will be unaltered. Bacteria and fungi eat food waste, helping it to rot, but they don’t usually eat plastic. The plastic won’t start to rot for another 450 years, so don’t wait around! After the experiment, you can reuse the jars and recycle the plastic.

If you’re a teacher or home educator looking for more teaching ideas and STEM activities covering the topic living things and habitats, check out the Rotting Rubbish investigation and an Investigation into Bacteria from the Whizz Pop Bang science and reading learning lab whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

COMPETITION TIME! WIN A SET OF PATCH BAMBOO PLASTERS FOR YOUR FAMILY…

PATCH plasters are made from 100% organic bamboo

PATCH adhesive bandages are crafted with 100% organic bamboo fibre with the added natural goodness of activated charcoal, aloe vera and coconut oil.

Did you know that most plasters contain plastic and so take a very long time to degrade? PATCH adhesive strips are wound coverings made from organic bamboo which break down in just a few weeks after they’ve been used.

Watch how PATCH plasters biodegrade…

Independently tested, PATCH Bamboo Plasters will break down naturally into the soil in a matter of weeks, making it the world’s first natural, organic bamboo plaster that is 100% compostable

We’ve got two sets of PATCH Bamboo Plasters to give away to two lucky Whizz Pop Bang readers! Each winner will get 25 Light Bamboo Patches (to help repair minor cuts), 25 Coconut Oil Patches (to soothe grazes), 25 Aloe Vera Patches (ideal for minor burns and blisters) and 25 Black Bamboo with Activated Charcoal Patches (for bites and splinters).

Grazed knees have never looked so good (or been so kind to the planet!)

PATCH, the natural alternative to wound care that just loves your skin!
LATEX FREE – PARABEN FREE-THIMEROSAL FREE – CRUELTY FREE

To enter this competition, answer this bamboo-zling question in the comments box below:

Bamboo is….

  1. The slowest-growing plant on the planet
  2. The most expensive plant on the planet
  3. The fastest-growing plant on the planet

This competition closes at midnight on 31st July 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

PATCH is available to buy from www.patchstrips.eu and from mid-July, you will be able to buy PATCH in most Holland & Barrett and Superdrug stores across the UK.

Primary science teaching resources on light

Hello teachers! Our newest resources are available to download, and they make the perfect accompaniment to the awesome Eye Spy edition of Whizz Pop Bang.

Year 6 and P7: Make a Periscope Lesson Pack

Make a periscope science resource pack from Whizz Pop Bang
Whizz Pop Bang investigation pack for year 6 and P7,
linking to the ‘light’ and ‘vibration and waves’

In this light investigation lesson pack, pupils will discover how light travels in straight lines and reflects off objects so we can see them. Pupils will learn about the different parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, pupil, retina and iris. Using mirrors and a kitchen roll, pupils will investigate light by building a simple periscope.

This downloadable pack includes:

  • A lesson plan, complete with top tips for setting up the activity
  • Printable instructions for the activity
  • A PowerPoint presentation that explains how we see
  • A writing frame for an explanation text with a diagram of the eye, to be used in English lessons
  • Three speedy science activities

Year 6 and P7: Bionic Eye Interview Reading Comprehension

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a biomedical engineer

This non-fiction Bionic Eye Interview text links to the ‘light’ and ‘vibrations and waves’ topics for year 6 and P7. The interview with Gregg Suaning, a Professor of Biomedical Engineering, explains how his team is developing a bionic eye called Phoenix99 that could help people who have lost their sight to see again.

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • Reading comprehension question sheet
  • An answer sheet including the objective for each question, which is taken from the reading National Curriculum

This historical scientist biography text for year 6 and P7, linking to the topics *light* and *vibrations and waves*, describes how Patricia Bath invented the ‘Laserphaco Probe’. This invention uses lasers to help break up and remove cataracts through a cut in the eye just 1 mm long. It has been used by eye doctors around the world.


Year 6 and P7: Historical Scientist Patricia Bath Reading Comprehension

Whizz Pop Bang reading pack on historical scientist Patricia Bath

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • A reading comprehension question sheet
  • An answer sheet including the objective for each question, which is taken from the reading national curriculum

Inside this eye-poppingly exciting edition of Whizz Pop Bang you’ll find all sorts of ways to trick your eyes!

You’ll meet a cheetah – they’re spotted, speedy and have super-sharp sight – and learn how creatures who live in the dark sense their surroundings.

You can also discover how microscopes work and have a go at making some fantastic 3D glasses.

Not yet a subscriber to our downloadable teaching resources?
Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids ABRACADABRA! December issue #29

Marvellous tricks and magical science

There’s magic in the air here at Whizz Pop Bang this Christmas! Prepare to wow your friends and family with all sorts of awesome tricks – each with a scientific explanation, of course!

You can make a reindeer with a mysterious moving head, make a dish completely disappear inside another dish, conjure up a Christmas star without using your hands, and magically join two paperclips without even touching them! These are just a few of the marvellous tricks and magical experiments inside the ABRACADABRA issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine.

Why not host a magic show in your house this Christmas? You can impress your family and friends with the magic tricks, and then WOW them by explaining how each trick works ?

Not a subscriber? Subscribe before midnight on 17th December 2017 and get this issue in time for Christmas!

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Conjure up a Christmas star without using your hands!

All of the instructions and explanations for this trick are on page 13 of issue 29 of Whizz Pop Bang, Abracadabra!

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Join two paperclips in the blink of an eye…

All of the instructions and explanations for this trick are on page 14 of issue 29 of Whizz Pop Bang, Abracadabra!

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Make a dish disappear inside another dish!

All of the instructions and explanations for this trick are on page 14 of issue 29 of Whizz Pop Bang, Abracadabra!

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Make a reindeer with a magically moving head!

All of the instructions and explanations for this trick are on page 17 of issue 29 of Whizz Pop Bang, Abracadabra!

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Not a subscriber? Subscribe before midnight on 17th December 2017 and get this issue in time for Christmas!

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Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids day of the dead skulls

The Whizz Pop Bang Halloween issue is out!

SPECTACULAR SKELETONS

The brilliant science of bones. Did you know that, weight for weight, bone is stronger than steel? Yes, your skeleton is made up of some spookily awesome stuff! Get stuck straight into the bare bones of this issue by crafting a scary skull mask, experimenting with some brilliant bendy bones and building your own model skeleton.

Buy this issue here and get crafting some seriously spooky stuff ready for Halloween ?

Activities included in this issue: make a ball and socket joint, bend a real bone, make a bendy back bone, make a moveable skeleton, craft an x-ray machine and make a Halloween skull mask. Loads of awesome science fun for kids!

Whizz Pop Bang dandelion test flight

All you need to know about SEEDS

Follow the ingenious journeys of seeds with our SUPER SEEDS issue! Learn about seed dispersal with our simple experiments and activities, like this dandelion model test to show just how far seeds can travel.

Whizz Pop Bang dandelion test flight

Dandelion test flight

You will need:

  • Sheet of A4 paper
  • Ruler
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Tape

What you do:

  1. Fold the paper into quarters and cut along the lines
  2. Take one of the quarters and rule a line as shown
  3. Cut lots of slits along the longer section, trying to make them less than 0.5 cm apart
  4. Roll the uncut area of the paper around your pencil as tightly as you can and secure with sticky tape
  5. Pull out the pencil and gently push down the paper strands so that they fan out in all directions

You should find:

You’ve made a model dandelion seed! Try dropping it from a height as a test flight. Throw it upwards into a strong wind and see how far it will go.

How do seeds travel?

To buy a copy of this issue, SUPER SEEDS, visit our back issue shop here. Back issues are £3.75 with FREE delivery to UK mainland, international delivery £1.50.

Whizz Pop Bang chromatography flowers

FLOWER POWER chromatography competition entries and winners!

In our FLOWER POWER issue Whizz Pop Bang readers learnt how to use the power of science to make these gorgeously frilly flowers. Paper chromatography is a neat little science trick that you can use to easily separate the different coloured inks out of felt tip pens.

Readers sent in their photos to enter the flower power competition to win a nature keeper tree diary set. As you’ll appreciate it was a tough job choosing just three winners – you should all be winners for producing these colourful creations! However, there could only be three winners and here they are:

Lula Brown, Aged 9
Isabel Soden, Aged 8
Jasper Warner, Aged 5

Congratulations, you have all won a Learning Resources Nature Keeper and Tree Diary Set perfect for summer science in the garden! Have a browse through all the entries for the competition, so many beautiful flowers and budding young scientists… ? ? ?

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids magnifying glass and hair

AWESOME SCIENCE FOR BUDDING YOUNG SCIENTISTS!

Whizz Pop Bang experimenting with nanotubes
A Whizz Pop Bang subscriber experimenting with nanotubes to see how carbon nanotubes behave

This month we zoom in on tiny science!

Imagine what it would be like to shrink to the size of a dot! This issue we’re doing exactly that to see how things work on a minuscule scale. 

This month we’ve got loads of supercool experiments and activities to turn your mini scientists into nano-scientists! Discover how a watch works, find out all about teeny tiny pygmy marmosets and find out what it’s like to be a nanotechnologist. Meet sensational scientist Richard Feynman, who encouraged scientists to “think small”. Plus, our 10 Awesomely Amazing tiny things that live on your body, blurghhh!

As always, happy experimenting 🙂

From the WPB team x

How to make fake snow with a disposable nappy!

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How to make fake snow with a disposable nappy!
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All you need to make your own fake snow at home are some cheap disposable nappies! Tear open the nappies over a large mixing bowl and shake out the small amount of white powder, so that it falls into your bowl. Remove any fluffy bits of nappy padding, then pour in some water, a little at a time, while stirring. You’ll be amazed at how much water the powder can absorb. Watch the spectacular transformation into slushy fake snow! The white powder is sodium polyacrylate, a polymer (a long chain-like molecule) which can absorb 300 times its own weight in water (which is why it’s used in nappies!).
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Whizz Pop Bang January issue SNOWBALL SCIENCE!

whizz-pop-bang-science-magazine-for-kids-snow-science

Happy New Year Whizz Pop Bang readers!

Oh how we love January with wet hats, missing gloves and runny noses. Whether it’s snowing outside or not, snow time like the present to start investigating the winter wonderland! With science magazine Whizz Pop Bang your kids can simulate a snowball flightinvestigate the colour of snowmake their own snow globemake a barometer, a weathervane and a rain gauge – a storm of science fun!

As well as lots of COOL experiments we look at how a freezer works, tell the story of the snowflake and interview a Penguin Aquarist to find out what it’s like working with those adorable creatures. Kids can marvel at 10 Awesomely Amazing Extreme Weather Events, and learn about polar bears (did you know their fur isn’t actually white?) We also tell the fascinating story of the genius Albert Einstein.

Looking forward to a fun-filled year of science with you guys 🙂

From the WPB team x

12 Days of Christmas Edible Science fun

Hello science-lovers! We’re super excited the Christmas issue of science magazine Whizz Pop Bang! Do you know the brilliant, crazy and uber creative Greg Foot? He’s the science guy on YouTube and presents science on Blue Peter, have you seen him? Well Greg has put together 12 awesome edible science experiments that really are the best entertainment for a very amusing (and tasty) family Christmas.

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And here are the 12 edible experiments, if you’d like to try these hop over and buy a copy of the Whizz Pop Bang Christmas issue here.

 

Remember experiments are experiments, which means you may not get them right first time – you’re scientists experimenting! If the lightning isn’t coming out of your sister’s mouth when you’re in the cupboard under the stairs don’t despair! Wait a little longer and try again, your eyes need to get really accustomed to the dark, and crunch really hard with your mouth open – you may dribble a little 🙂

Our raisins didn’t dance the first time, so we tried again with fizzier water. The lava toffee can be tricky too, add a little water if you need to and be careful with the hot pan in all that excitement.

We filmed our kids playing with the weird custard go, see their reactions here: whizz-pop-bang-science-experiment-custard-goo

Do you have questions about these experiments or Whizz Pop Bang? Send us an email hello@whizzpopbang.com and we’ll be only too happy to help.