EASY SCIENCE FOR KIDS: Decomposing experiment + competition to win PATCH bamboo plasters!

Are you looking for free experiments for kids? Here’s an easy science experiment that doesn’t need any special materials or skills, just bags of curiosity…

This decomposing experiment is a great way to show composting in action. If you’re looking for STEM activities for primary school or home school science lessons about living things and habitats, this investigation is a winner!

Keep scrolling to be in with a chance of winning some awesome, earth-friendly prizes, too!

Decomposing experiment for kids

Rotting Rubbish decomposing experiment from Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

For this experiment you will need:

  • Two jam jars of the same size
  • Two pieces of old fabric
  • Two elastic bands
  • Compost or soil
  • Finely chopped banana or other fruit
  • Small pieces of plastic or polystyrene

The decomposing experiment

  1. Set up the experiment as shown. Each jar should contain the same depth of compost.
  2. Sprinkle a few drops of water over the fruit and plastic.
  3. Leave the experiment for at least five days, noting any changes in the jars.

You should find the fruit will have started to rot but the plastic will be unaltered. Bacteria and fungi eat food waste, helping it to rot, but they don’t usually eat plastic. The plastic won’t start to rot for another 450 years, so don’t wait around! After the experiment, you can reuse the jars and recycle the plastic.

If you’re a teacher or home educator looking for more teaching ideas and STEM activities covering the topic living things and habitats, check out the Rotting Rubbish investigation and an Investigation into Bacteria from the Whizz Pop Bang science and reading learning lab whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

COMPETITION TIME! WIN A SET OF PATCH BAMBOO PLASTERS FOR YOUR FAMILY…

PATCH plasters are made from 100% organic bamboo

PATCH adhesive bandages are crafted with 100% organic bamboo fibre with the added natural goodness of activated charcoal, aloe vera and coconut oil.

Did you know that most plasters contain plastic and so take a very long time to degrade? PATCH adhesive strips are wound coverings made from organic bamboo which break down in just a few weeks after they’ve been used.

Watch how PATCH plasters biodegrade…

Independently tested, PATCH Bamboo Plasters will break down naturally into the soil in a matter of weeks, making it the world’s first natural, organic bamboo plaster that is 100% compostable

We’ve got two sets of PATCH Bamboo Plasters to give away to two lucky Whizz Pop Bang readers! Each winner will get 25 Light Bamboo Patches (to help repair minor cuts), 25 Coconut Oil Patches (to soothe grazes), 25 Aloe Vera Patches (ideal for minor burns and blisters) and 25 Black Bamboo with Activated Charcoal Patches (for bites and splinters).

Grazed knees have never looked so good (or been so kind to the planet!)

PATCH, the natural alternative to wound care that just loves your skin!
LATEX FREE – PARABEN FREE-THIMEROSAL FREE – CRUELTY FREE

To enter this competition, answer this bamboo-zling question in the comments box below:

Bamboo is….

  1. The slowest-growing plant on the planet
  2. The most expensive plant on the planet
  3. The fastest-growing plant on the planet

This competition closes at midnight on 31st July 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

PATCH is available to buy from www.patchstrips.eu and from mid-July, you will be able to buy PATCH in most Holland & Barrett and Superdrug stores across the UK.

We’ve got five copies of The Bacteria Book to giveaway!

Bacteria book competition

The good, the bad and the ugly, bacteria are everywhere! Learn all about gross germs, vile viruses and funky fungi in this fascinating book written by the aptly named Steve Mould, published by Dorling Kindersley.

To be in with a chance of winning one of these books simply answer this question:

Where can bacteria be found?

a) Antarctic ice

b) Clouds

c) Ocean trenches

d) All of the above

Hint: the answer is in the Bug-tastic Bacteria issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine!

To enter comment below with your answer by midnight on 30th November 2018. By entering this competition you agree to our terms and conditions.

Win this icon

WIN! The Story of Inventions by Anna Claybourne and Adam Larkum

Competition time!

We’ve got five copies of The Story of Inventions to giveaway! Who invented the toilet, umbrella and diving suits? Find out in this fascinating book of inventions…

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine competition to win the story of inventions book

To enter simply answer this question in the comment box below:

Who created the world’s first electric motor?

a) Michael Faraday

b) Michael Magnet

c) Michael Field

Deadline to enter is midnight on 31st May 2018.

By entering this competition you agree to our terms and conditions. Thanks to Usborne Books for supplying the prizes.

Competition time for Mum and Dad! And maybe Grandpa too…

Sand by Michael Welland

We have a copy of this fascinating book to give-away as a prize for one our awesome Whizz Pop Bang grown-ups; whether that’s Mum, Dad or maybe a grandparent who likes playing in the sand!  SAND: A journey through science and the imagination is written by Michael Welland.

How to enter: simply send a photo of yourself buried in the sand! Yes it has to be you (a grown-up), and it could be just your feet or your whole body, we’re not too fussy on that detail. The winner will be the funniest photo so get creative! You can also send in an old photo, we love a relic 😉

Post, send or tweet your photos by 5th September. We will contact you if you photo is a winner for your address.

Synopsis for SAND on Amazon:

‘This book is all about sand – sand in individual grains, each one a little different; sand in piles; sand in shoals and dunes; the science of sand but also, shot through the book, sand and imagination – the art and the music of sand. Did you know that the Sand Mountain in Nevada emits a low C, while dunes in Chile sound an F, and those in Morocco a G#?  
For all its ubiquity, sand is an extraordinary substance. For scientists, it is important in many ways: it represents the crushed remains of past rock, and builds up into layers in lake and ocean beds, layers of sandstone from which we can extract the history of deep time; its erosion creates complex landscapes of mounds and dunes which move in characteristic ways; its grains are remarkable individually and in their behaviour together as a granular material. And to travellers, poets and artists, the deserts it forms are full of grandeur and pathos. Michael Welland is a geologist who has a passion for sand. He shows that truly, one can see a world, both in space and time, in a grain of sand.’