EASY SCIENCE FOR KIDS: Decomposing experiment + competition to win PATCH bamboo plasters!

Are you looking for free experiments for kids? Here’s an easy science experiment that doesn’t need any special materials or skills, just bags of curiosity…

This decomposing experiment is a great way to show composting in action. If you’re looking for STEM activities for primary school or home school science lessons about living things and habitats, this investigation is a winner!

Keep scrolling to be in with a chance of winning some awesome, earth-friendly prizes, too!

Decomposing experiment for kids

Rotting Rubbish decomposing experiment from Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

For this experiment you will need:

  • Two jam jars of the same size
  • Two pieces of old fabric
  • Two elastic bands
  • Compost or soil
  • Finely chopped banana or other fruit
  • Small pieces of plastic or polystyrene

The decomposing experiment

  1. Set up the experiment as shown. Each jar should contain the same depth of compost.
  2. Sprinkle a few drops of water over the fruit and plastic.
  3. Leave the experiment for at least five days, noting any changes in the jars.

You should find the fruit will have started to rot but the plastic will be unaltered. Bacteria and fungi eat food waste, helping it to rot, but they don’t usually eat plastic. The plastic won’t start to rot for another 450 years, so don’t wait around! After the experiment, you can reuse the jars and recycle the plastic.

If you’re a teacher or home educator looking for more teaching ideas and STEM activities covering the topic living things and habitats, check out the Rotting Rubbish investigation and an Investigation into Bacteria from the Whizz Pop Bang science and reading learning lab whizzpopbang.com/teaching-resources

COMPETITION TIME! WIN A SET OF PATCH BAMBOO PLASTERS FOR YOUR FAMILY…

PATCH plasters are made from 100% organic bamboo

PATCH adhesive bandages are crafted with 100% organic bamboo fibre with the added natural goodness of activated charcoal, aloe vera and coconut oil.

Did you know that most plasters contain plastic and so take a very long time to degrade? PATCH adhesive strips are wound coverings made from organic bamboo which break down in just a few weeks after they’ve been used.

Watch how PATCH plasters biodegrade…

Independently tested, PATCH Bamboo Plasters will break down naturally into the soil in a matter of weeks, making it the world’s first natural, organic bamboo plaster that is 100% compostable

We’ve got two sets of PATCH Bamboo Plasters to give away to two lucky Whizz Pop Bang readers! Each winner will get 25 Light Bamboo Patches (to help repair minor cuts), 25 Coconut Oil Patches (to soothe grazes), 25 Aloe Vera Patches (ideal for minor burns and blisters) and 25 Black Bamboo with Activated Charcoal Patches (for bites and splinters).

Grazed knees have never looked so good (or been so kind to the planet!)

PATCH, the natural alternative to wound care that just loves your skin!
LATEX FREE – PARABEN FREE-THIMEROSAL FREE – CRUELTY FREE

To enter this competition, answer this bamboo-zling question in the comments box below:

Bamboo is….

  1. The slowest-growing plant on the planet
  2. The most expensive plant on the planet
  3. The fastest-growing plant on the planet

This competition closes at midnight on 31st July 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

PATCH is available to buy from www.patchstrips.eu and from mid-July, you will be able to buy PATCH in most Holland & Barrett and Superdrug stores across the UK.

62,000 children take part in Great Science Share for Schools

Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell of Manchester University

Tomorrow, Tuesday 18th June, over 62,000 children are taking part in the Great Science Share for Schools to share their science learning.

The Great Science Share is about children communicating something that they have been investigating which starts with a question that they are interested in. By promoting child-centred learning in science, the campaign provides opportunity for young people to communicate their scientific questions and investigations to new audiences – in their own words and ways. They will even grill University and civic leaders on matters of climate crisis.

WHERE? All over the world! Schools across the UK, Nigeria, Brazil and India are taking part. See if schools near you are having an event on the map below, or visit greatscienceshare.org for the interactive map.

Great Science Share for schools map of satellite events

The national campaign led by The University of Manchester aims to inspire young people from across the UK and overseas to share their science learning with new audiences. Children and teachers from schools as far afield as Nigeria, India and Brazil, are getting involved alongside children from Great Ormond Street and Manchester Hospital Schools.

The Great Science Share for Schools’ UK flagship event will take place at The University of Manchester’s Whitworth Art Gallery on Tuesday, 18 June. This will see hundreds of children from 45 primary schools across Greater Manchester demonstrating their own science investigations to each other on campus.

Are your children taking part? Is your school hosting a satellite event? Share your experiences!

The consequences of plastic pollution are at the forefront of the Manchester event, as Derby High School students share their findings through a specially choreographed dance, whilst other children from Park View Community School have considered what a non-plastic world might look like. This year it’s evident that children are concerned with the environment and how they can use science and engineering to improve lives.

Students will also be putting questions to Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell and Lord Mayor of Manchester Councillor Abid Latif Chohan about what current and aspiring scientists alike can help address some of the planets biggest problems.

“Once again the Great Science Share for Schools has grown and it’s outstanding to see how such a simple concept can spread so wide. We are proud to be able to give children an opportunity where their scientific questions and interest are valued.”

Dr Lynne Bianchi, Head of SEERIH (Science & Engineering Education Research and Innovation Hub)

Helping children in Nepal to enjoy science

We have one simple aim for Whizz Pop Bang, and that’s to help as many children as possible to enjoy the wonderful world of science.

A few months ago a man called Brian Mildenhall, who works for a charity in Nepal, phoned and asked if we could donate some magazines for the children he helps. Brian works for a charity called Freedom Kit Bags which was set up to help end period poverty in Nepal. As well as supplying sanitary wear for women and girls, the team behind Freedom Kit Bags deliver education too.

Brian took a box of Whizz Pop Bang magazines on his most recent trip out to Nepal, and just last week he sent us these heart-warming photos of the children reading them at school. We’re all so touched to see our magazines in the hands of Nepalese children and teachers, helping them to read English and enjoy science. Thank you Brian and team for doing what you do! ❤️👍🏾🧠

International women and girls in science day!

Big shout out to Whizz Pop Bang girls today – it’s international women and girls in science day 👩🏽‍🔬🎉👨🏼‍🔬👏🏾 We’re hugely proud to be inspiring scientists of the future… girls & boys!
 
Thanks to these two super scientists from Shaw Ridge primary school for sending in their rendition of the periodic table song, you’ve got amazing memories!👇🏿

What age is Whizz Pop Bang for?

What age range is Whizz Pop Bang magazine for? We’re often asked this question, and the answer is it really depends on the child. As a guide we say our magazines are written and designed for 6 to 12-year-olds, however the best way to see if it’s suitable for your child is to have a browse before you buy! It’s also worth having a read of some of the reviews from parents and grandparents who tell us the ages of the children they subscribe for.

Have a flick through our Planetary Adventures issue here 👇🏾

If you have any questions about Whizz Pop Bang visit our FAQ page, send us an email or call us on 0330 2233790. We’re always happy to hear from our customers!

Awesomely honest reviews for Whizz Pop Bang…

Boys with their SPY issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

Your reviews and feedback mean the world to us, so thank you to all these families who have taken the time to share their thoughts on Whizz Pop Bang, the awesomely amazing science magazine for kids!

“My 9yr old daughter has received her first copy and is thrilled with it. Excellent magazine. Word of warning though, I do unfortunately appear to have inadvertently learned stuff too due to her constant verbal updates whilst reading it. Be warned, it could happen to you!” 🤯
Gemma Dodgson

“I love the fact that women engineers and scientists feature so prominently. I hadn’t realised this was the case when I first subscribed, and originally subscribed simply because it looked like a fun way to get a greater exposure to science, but it really stands out for me. I also love the use of proper scientific terminology because it familiarises children to this language and makes science more accessible.”
Cat

“My daughter starts asking a week before it pops through our letterbox when will it be here. Best birthday present she’s ever received.”
Nicky Doyle

“My son said “Whizz Pop Bang is the best magazine ever, I love the jokes especially”
Ella Weaver

“My son reads it cover to cover! More than once! He even refers back to back copies. (The pile on the bed is huge!)”
Ed Bickerstaffe

“Fantastic magazine and helps so much with our daughters love of science”
Tracey Cook

“My daughter loves the magazine. She is really excited every month when it arrives. She wants to be a scientist when she grows up so that she can ‘change the world’ and that says it all really!”
Anna Hodgin

“We are a home educating family and I choose not to use the discount because I believe that it is already great value for money. We (age range from 34 – 5) all get excited when Whizz Pop Bang comes through the door. It gives us the opportunity to explore things/people that we may not have heard of before in a style that all of us can understand and use as a base to explore articles further. I personally enjoy ‘Animal antics’, ‘Interview with a science hero’, ‘how stuff works’, Ten awesomely amazing’ and Sensational scientists.”
Leech family

“It is an awesome magazine. As a mum I like that you email me a supply list before the magazine arrives. All three of my children love it ages 6, 13 and 15.”
Michelle

“I’m also a Childminder so I’ve kept all the copies so they can access all the back issues when topics arise at school. I imagine that the babies I mind will look at these in the years to come as well as my grandchildren.”
Caroline Francis

“My child took a copy to school and the teacher was so delighted he said he’d buy W.P.B too! 😁”
E. Yates

“I have been very impressed with WPB. My boys love receiving their own post (in such vibrant and environmentally friendly packaging) each month and can’t wait to open it. The experiments and articles are pitched at the perfect level and inspire them to think about topics that they might not otherwise come across. I will be continuing the subscription for their little sister when she is old enough, too.”
Rebecca Wale

“Whizz Pop Bang is an excellent resource that I have recommended to several parents and teachers. My kids look forward to receiving the magazine every month, and my son is currently reading this month’s out loud to me. Please keep up the good work!”
Cathy Campbell

“I’m an archaeological scientist. I want my son to understand why I love what I do; that science can be beautiful, and awe-inspiring, and fun. Your magazine forms a central part of this nefarious propaganda machine, so … thank you!”
Chloe Duckworth

“I love the accessible feel and the range of topics covered each month. I really appreciate the advance warning emails so I can prepare for forthcoming experiments”
Jo Jenks

“Our daughter loves receiving Whizz Pop Bang looks forward to it each month. She’s excited about science and a passionate feminist so it’s great that the magazine provides role models of women in STEM. We’re also impressed with the decision to use paper envelopes rather than plastic wrappers. Thank you.”
Sarah Giles

Listen to our exclusive interview with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!

How lucky are we to get not one, but two interviews with ESA astronaut Tim Peake!!!!! Our editor Tammy chatted to Tim on the phone, asking him lots of probing questions from curious Whizz Pop Bang readers (see the list of questions below).

Listen to the full interview, complete with NASA footage and photos here 👇🏾

Enjoy space-lovers!

The questions Whizz Pop Bang readers asked Tim:

  1. What did it feel like taking off in a rocket?
  2. Do your ears pop during take-off like they do on a plane?
  3. How long does it take to get into space?
  4. How long does it take to actually get to the space station?
  5. Do you have to stay put in the capsule for the whole journey? And what happens if you need the loo?
  6. What does it feel like to be weightless?
  7. What’s it like seeing Earth from space?
  8. Does seeing Earth make you feel differently about the fragility of the environment?
  9. What was your scariest moment in space?
  10. Is it cold on a spacewalk?
  11. Why does the Soyuz craft look so black and battered now?
  12. Did it hurt when you landed?
  13. What was it like coming back to Earth?
  14. What do you miss most when you’re in space?
  15. Where would you most like to travel to in space?
  16. Do you think flights to Mars will ever happen?
  17. Do you think we will ever find extra-terrestrial life?
  18. What advice do you have for budding space scientists?

Photo and video credits Tim Peake, NASA, ESA, Victor Zelentsov and Scott Kelly.

Agnes Arber photo in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

Scientists from history

Each month we celebrate a sensational scientist from history; an eminent figure in the creation, invention or discovery of a scientific breakthrough. How many famous scientists can you name? How many of those are women? Female scientists were often forgotten or unknown, simply because they were women. And yet their work was instrumental in discovering hugely important scientific breakthroughs.

Inside Whizz Pop Bang magazine your kids will discover the historic world of science; who invented computers, who discovered the milky way and who is responsible for how we forecast the weather. We tell the story of these fascinating scientists, both male and female, and how they came to discover incredible things.

A few examples of the less well-known women we’ve featured: Lise Meitner, whose work led to the discovery of nuclear fission, astronomer Caroline Herschel and Agnes Arber, botanist and early ambassador in helping the world to recognize the amazing talent of women in science. Read the full list of sensational scientists below.

The story of Agnes Arber in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

List of the sensational scientists featured in Whizz Pop Bang magazine:

Issue 1: Mary Anning

Issue 2: Charles Darwin

Issue 3: Maria Telkes

Issue 4: Leonardo da Vinci

Issue 5: Lise Meitner

Issue 6: Louis Pasteur

Issue 7: Rosalind Franklin

Issue 8: Antoine Lavoisier

Issue 9: Mary Somerville

Issue 10: Charles Lyell

Issue 11: Caroline Herschel

Issue 12: Jacques Cousteau

Issue 13: Grace Hopper

Issue 14: Roy Chapman Andrews

Issue 15: William Henry Perkin

Issue 16: Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Issue 17: Florence Nightingale

Issue 18: Albert Einstein

Issue 19: Gregor Mendel

Issue 20: Rachel Carson

Issue 21: Ibn al Haytham

Issue 22: Richard Feynman

Issue 23: Agnes Arber

Issue 24: Alfred Wegener

Issue 25: Jeanne Villepreux-Power

Issue 26: George de Mestral, velcro

Issue 27: Marie Curie

Issue 28: Nicolaus Copernicus

Issue 29: Hedy Lamarr

Issue 30: Archimedes

Issue 31: Anselmus De Boot

Issue 32: Joseph Bazalgette

Issue 33: Charles Darwin

Issue 34: Michael Faraday

Issue 35: Gerty Cori

To buy a back issue for just £3.75 (with free UK delivery!) visit our shop.