WIN a pocket swing!

This competition is now CLOSED.

We’re all hoping for some glorious weather this August bank holiday and what could be a better way to prepare than to win a brilliant POCKET SWING from Hape?

If that sounds good to you, then hurry – this competition is only open for a few days so we can make sure that the winner receives their swing in time for the long weekend.

We’ve got one NATURE FUN POCKET SWING to give away!

It comes in a pouch small enough to toss into a backpack, but when set up between two strong trees between 1.5 m and 2 m apart, it makes a swing or seat that can support up to 100 kg with no drilling or fixings required.

Even better, each swing is made from polyester recycled from an average of three PET bottles. What a clever bit of kit!

To be in with a chance of winning, complete the name of this song:

Swing low, sweet…

  1. wheelbarrow
  2. chariot
  3. dumper truck

This competition closes at midnight on 19th August 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

COMPETITION TIME! WIN a set of Great Guides to Little Lives books!

These gorgeous books introduce children to some inspiring characters from history.

We’ve got a set of eight Little Guides to Great Lives books to give away to one lucky reader, including the two newest titles to join the series: Ferdinand Magellan and Anne Frank, written by Whizz Pop Bang magazine’s very own science expert, Isabel Thomas!

Just answer this question to be in with a chance of winning:

Ferdinand Magellan was a famous…

  1. Train driver
  2. Sailor and navigator
  3. Astronaut

This competition closes at midnight on 31st August 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

Primary Science Resources: Earth and Space and Light

Great news! Our latest teaching resources linking to the Hello sunshine issue are ready to brighten your classroom.

Not yet a subscriber to Whizz Pop Bang downloadable teaching resources? Start a subscription today!

Year 3 and P4 Make A Pinhole Camera Lesson Pack

Light: Make a pinhole camera

Investigate how we need light to see
Topic: Light and Vibrations and Waves
Year Groups: Year 3 and P4

A practical activity for year 3 and P4, linking to the topics light and vibrations and waves. This pack explains what the Sun is, how we can use it for energy, why we need to stay safe in the Sun and how we need light to see. We should never look directly at the Sun, but a pinhole camera is a simple gadget that allows you to take a peek.

This pack includes:

  • A differentiated lesson plan, which includes a scientific explanation of how the pinhole camera works
  • A PowerPoint presentation explaining the Sun and how we see
  • Printable instructions to make a pinhole camera using materials which are difficult to recycle
  • Printable eye to cut and stick on the end of the camera
Year 5 and P4 Make A Sundial Lesson Pack


Earth and space: Make a sundial


Investigate why we have day and night.
Topic: Earth and space
Year groups: Year 5 and P4


Linking to the topics Earth and space and space, year 5 and P4 pupils will investigate how Earth travels around the Sun by making a sundial. This lesson will take place over short intervals throughout one day, when children will mark the end of the shadow on the sundial, demonstrating how the Sun moves across the sky due to the Earth’s rotation.

This pack includes:

  • A differentiated lesson plan
  • A PowerPoint presentation explaining the Sun
  • A printable template to make the sundial
Year 6 and P7 Pondweed Investigation

Pondweed investigation


Investigate how light and temperature affect pondweed.
Topics: Living things and Habitats and Biodiversity and Interdependence
Year groups: Year 6 and P7

A practical investigation for year 6 and P7 linking to the topics living things and habitats and biodiversity and interdependence. It’s hard to see photosynthesis in action… until you get hold of some pondweed! Pupils will set up their own investigations to see how light and temperature affect the rate that oxygen gas is produced by pondweed.

This pack includes:

  • A differentiated lesson plan, which includes a scientific explanation
  • A PowerPoint explaining photosynthesis
  • Instructions for both experiments

Historical Biography of Scientist Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin


Historical scientist Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin


A scientist who changed our understanding of the Sun.
Topic: Earth and Space
Year groups: Year 5 and P6

This biography text for year 5 and P6, linking to the topics Earth and Space and Space, explains how Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin changed our understanding of the Sun. Cecilia thought maths was magical – especially algebra. In the early 1900s, girls didn’t receive the same education as boys, but Cecilia demanded to be taught science and maths. She went on to study science at the University of Cambridge. There she decided to become an astronomer. In 1925, Cecilia’s maths had led her to an exciting discovery – the main elements in stars, including our Sun, were hydrogen and helium. Up until then, everyone had assumed that the Sun was made up of a mix of materials similar to Earth.

The downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.
  • Answer sheets


Interview with a Solar Physicist

Interview with a Solar Physicist

Lucie Green controls space missions
Topic: Earth and Space
Year Groups: Year 5 and P6

In this interview text for year 5 and P6, linking to the topic Earth and space, Lucie Green explains how she collects data to learn more about the Sun. She explains when she knew she wanted to be a scientist, a typical day as a solar physicist and her involvement with the European Solar Orbiter mission, which is due to launch in 2020.

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.




Explanation text about Solar Panels


Explanation text about solar panels

This text explains how solar panels work
Topic: Earth and Space
Year groups: Year 5 and P6

This explanation text for year 5 and P6, linking to the topic earth and space, explains how solar panels create clean electricity from nothing more than sunlight. From rooftops to space stations, solar panels are an increasingly important source of renewable energy. This text explains the following technical vocabulary: phosphorus, photovoltaic cells and boron.

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets.
Aurora From ISS

Space: Aurora from ISS
A close-up image of an aurora from space

A short discussion topic suitable for year 5 and P6 linking with the topics Earth and Space and Space. This is a super photo of an aurora taken from the International Space Station by astronaut Scott Kelly. These fantastic natural light displays happen when particles from the Sun collide with particles in the Earth’s atmosphere.

This ten-minute activity, linking to speaking and listening, is ideal for use at the beginning of the day or during transition times, such as after lunch. Pupils will be challenged to guess what the image is by answering the questions shown on the first slide of the PowerPoint. This could be done on the whiteboard or through discussion with a partner. Once pupils have finished, click through to the next slide to reveal the answers.


Primary Science Resources: Human Body Waste Functions

Great news! Our latest resources to accompany the Pee Power edition of Whizz Pop Bang are now available to download.

Not yet a subscriber to our downloadable teaching resources? Start a subscription today!

Investigate The Urinary System Lesson Pack

Make a Urinary System

Explore how our bodies get rid of chemicals we don’t need.
Topic: Animals including Humans and Body Systems and Cells
Year Groups: 6 and P7


This lesson pack teaches children how our urinary systems work. Your body has a whole wee-producing department called the urinary system, including your kidneys, bladder and the tubes that connect them and carry the wee out of your body.

This lesson pack includes:

  • A lesson plan, complete with an explanation of how our kidneys work
  • Differentiated printable instructions to make a urinary system
  • A PowerPoint presentation that explains how the urinary system and kidneys work
  • A printable wee colour chart
  • A ‘Wee-ly true’ quiz
Kidney Glomerulus Spectacular Science

Kidney glomerulus

Topic: Animals including Humans and Body Systems and Cells
Year Groups: 2 to 6 and P3 to P7


A short discussion topic. This impressive image shows a close-up view of a kidney glomerulus. Each kidney has around a million glomeruli that filter toxic waste from the blood.

This ten-minute activity, linking to speaking and listening, is ideal for use at the beginning of the day or during transition times, such as after lunch. Pupils will be challenged to guess what the image is by answering the questions shown on the first slide of the PowerPoint. Once pupils have finished, click through to the next slide to reveal the answers.

Interview With A Bioengineer Reading Comprehension

Interview with a bioengineer

Interview with a scientist who turns waste into energy.
Topic: Animals including Humans and Body Systems and Cells
Year Groups: 4 and P5


This interview text delves into what a bioengineer does. Yannis Ieropoulos has designed and created the ‘Pee Power’ toilet, a system that fuels itself and creates little waste. He spends most of his days thinking a lot about toilets, robots and other electronic systems that could be self-sustainable.

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • Differentiated reading comprehension question sheets
  • Answer sheets
Historical Scientist Hennig Brand Reading Comprehension

Historical Scientist Hennig Brand

Hennig Brand was an alchemist.
Topic: Animals including Humans and Body Systems and Cells
Year Groups: 4 and P5


This biography text describes the life of historical scientist Hennig Brand. He was an alchemist who lived in Germany in the 17th century and was the first to discover an element. Hennig found phosphorus whilst experimenting with wee!

This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print
  • Differentiated reading comprehension question sheets
  • Answer sheets

Latest science news across the world

This month we look at:

  • Black hole seen for the first time
  • Measles crisis
  • Kids sue American government over climate change
  • Wee-loving goats airlifted from national park
  • ‘Mission Jurassic’ dino dig begins
  • This A3 downloadable reading spread is available for you to print.
Science News From Around The World In The Pee Power Issue of Whizz Pop Bang.

Issue 47 – Pee Power
Find out what wee is, why it’s so important and how your body makes it!
Discover some of the wee-rder wonders of urine – did you know that the Romans used wee for cleaning their teeth? Which animal can pee whilst doing a handstand?! Have a go at brewing up some fake wee, create a model urinary tract system and put up the wee colour chart in the classroom.

Word wheel!

Have you tried the word wheel puzzle in the Wild Wheels issue of Whizz Pop Bang? See how many words (or two letters or more) you can make from the letters in the wheel – they all must contain the letter ‘O’! There’s one seven-letter word hiding inside, too…

You might be surprised by how many words can be made from these letters – it’s over 100!

Find loads more wheel-related puzzles, experiments and more in WILD WHEELS, on sale now!

Scroll down when you’re ready for the answers… no peeking!

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Here they are…

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Did you find the 7-letter word? It’s SCOOTER!

Here’s our full list – but have you found any more? Let us know in the comments!

6-letter words: 

1) escort 2) roscoe 3) torose 4) rectos 5) scoter 6) coster 7) cooers 8) sector 9) corset

5-letter words: 

1) roots 2) store 3) escot 4) torso 5) roost 6) score 7) scoot 8) rotos 9) roset 10) rotes 11) crest 12) roose 13) ceros 14) cooer 15) torse 16) coots 17) toros 18) cores 19) tores 20) corse 21) coset 22) torcs 23) recto 24) cotes

4-letter words: 

1) rets 2) rote 3) rose 4) root 5) rocs 6) roes 7) roto 8) tors 9) toro 10) tore 11) torc 12) toes 13) sort 14) sore 15) soot 16) scot 17) rots 18) sect 19) erst 20) oots 21) eros 22) cote 23) orts 24) cots 25) cost 26) cero 27) core 28) recs 29) orcs 30) coot 31) rest 32) coos 33) ores

3-letter words: 

1) coo 2) set 3) sot 4) toe 5) too 6) tor 7) cot 8) cor 9) ser 10) cos 11) ret 12) ors 13) rot 14) ort 15) ose 16) rec 17) res18) roe 19) roc 20) ore 21) orc 22) sec 23) ers 24) oot 25) oes

2-letter words: 

1) to 2) oe 3) so 4) re 5) et 6) or 7) os 8) er 9) es

Wind wheels

See the force of the wind in action with this easy science experiment from the Wild Wheels issue of Whizz Pop Bang!

Snip and fold some wonderful wind wheels and race them on a windy day. You’ll see the force of the wind in action, as the moving air pushes against the folded paper to make the wheels spin. 

This simple science activity allows you to see changes in the speed and direction of the wind.

Wind blows horizontally from areas of high pressure to low pressure, and the speed depends on the rate of air pressure change, or gradient, between the two pressure areas. The greater the pressure difference, the faster the winds, and the quicker your wind wheels will roll!

Find some epic cut-and-fold wind wheels in issue 49 of Whizz Pop Bang!

Top tips for teaching primary science, from Dr Leigh Hoath

Dr Leigh Hoath is Editor of the Association for Science Education’s Primary Science journal. Her work reaches out to teachers across the whole age phase of primary schools in order to try to support engagement and interest in science. Her interests lie predominantly in improving learning and teaching in Primary Science, pedagogy and working in the outdoor setting.

Dr Leigh Hoath’s top tips for teaching primary science:

  1. Be Bold
  2. Make it relevant
  3. Talk to people in the science industry, in business and make use of the educational outreach science museums offer for schools

One of the easiest ways to make science relevant for kids, whilst keeping to the curriculum, is to subscribe to a magazine like Whizz Pop Bang. Our subscriptions for schools allow children to independently read up-to-date news articles every month about things that are happening in their world, as well as the big news stories written in a way to inform children, without worrying them.

To accompany each issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, there’s a library of online resources for schools, all planned and ready to download and teach – with a handy kit list of inexpensive household items to carry out the investigations.

Teachers can deliver hands-on science lessons that are both fun and hands-on for children, getting a ‘deep dive’ experience they’ll remember.

“Using Whizz Pop Bang has revitalized our science teaching. The quality of the resources are first class and particularly support cross curricular links through the reading comprehension activities. We have found these to be particularly useful at the upper end of KS2 where science can be used as a vehicle to support SATs, making use of skills of inference and deduction based on relevant scientific topics. In addition the planning offers exciting practical ideas, particularly useful to teachers who are not scientific specialists. The children absolutely love carrying out the real-life experiments.”

Sally Cowell, Head teacher at Shaw Ridge Primary school, Swindon

See the Dynasphere in action

Issue 49 of Whizz Pop Bang is all about the wonders of wheels, and one of our 10 awesomely amazing wheeled vehicles is the whacky Dynasphere! This was a single-wheeled vehicle built in 1930 but inspired by a sketch made by Leonardo da Vinci more than 400 years earlier. The vehicle could reach 48 km/h but was almost impossible to steer!

Check out the Dynasphere in action here:

Meet science-mad Apollo, age 5, who wants to save the Earth!

Every month we receive emails, letters and photos from our readers telling us how much they love science, and reading Whizz Pop Bang. We often read them out in the office and love being inspired by our readers, aka scientists of the future! With permission, we also share them here on our blog – enjoy finding out about Apollo and his mission to save the Earth…

Dear Whizz Pop Bang magazine,

My 5 years old son is mad about science and is a fervent reader of your magazine. We went to Kew’s Science Festival two weeks ago and when we came back he told me that he wanted to let other children know about the importance of seed preservation and the work that the scientists are doing. He decided that the best way was sending it to you! He feels very deeply about the environmental problems and really wants to help nature!
I am attaching his letter and some photos – he was really excited about explaining what he saw!

Thank you immensely for all the wonderful work you do for our youngsters and children. Your magazine is a invaluable source of inspiration and information. 

Thank you from a mum of two science lovers and eager Whizz Pop Bang readers!
Elisabeth Bulbena Vela

Apollo’s report, written himself with just a little help at the end (also transcribed below)

Apollo’s report on his trip to Kew science festival  
On Sunday 26th May I went to the Kew Science Festival at Wakehurst and I went inside the Millenium Seed Bank. This is the place where scientists store seeds of all the plants in Earth. Scientists travel around the world collecting seeds, then they dry, clean, select and sort them. Finally, they put them inside cold rooms so that they can survive for hundreds of years.

I think this is important because if all the trees or plants of one specie die, Kew scientists have the seeds and can grow the same plant or tree again. Plants are extinguishing because humans create problems to Earth like pollution, fires and deforestation that destroy food chains and ecosystems.

I also learnt that bees help to grow plants (pollination), I extracted DNA of a strawberry and sorted seeds in the lab. I like this Festival because I love science, nature and to save the Earth! I have started a seed collection tool!
 
Apollo Premadasa
5 years old

Do you have a science-mad child, grandchild or pupil in your school? Are they passionate about taking action and doing something to help make changes? Tell us all about it, we’d love to hear from you!

How can your primary school embrace the new Ofsted framework?

The new Ofsted framework comes into place from September 2019. Its focus is on ensuring that primary schools are delivering a well-rounded education across the whole of the primary curriculum. This is an exciting time for science and all other non-assessed primary subjects as it shifts some of the focus away from maths and literacy.

To help schools prepare for the changes, we’ve got some top tips on how Whizz Pop Bang’s new primary science and reading resources can help deliver a cross-curricular approach in your school.

Below are some of the key requirements from the new Ofsted framework…

  1. “Learners study the full curriculum. Providers ensure this by teaching a full range of subjects for as long as possible, ‘specialising’ only when necessary.”
    During their top-level view, headteachers will be asked to explain how their curriculum is implemented and inspectors will explore what is on offer to students.  As they start to deep dive into science, they will want to see a sequence of lessons, scrutinize books and talk to pupils. They will be checking for coverage but more importantly that pupils learn and remember.

  2. “Coverage is a prerequisite for learning, but simply having covered a part of the curriculum does not in itself indicate that pupils know or remember more.”
    Here at Whizz Pop Bang our aim is to put the Whizz, Pop and Bang into science and topic lessons in primary schools. We create lessons that are fun, easy to teach and therefore memorable for pupils and teachers alike (in a good way!).
    Kids love our hands-on experiments; making exploding rockets, growing mould and testing out cool paper planes, making recycling machines and finding out why things float… trying out experiments that fail and learning from trying again. Subscribe to Whizz Pop Bang for your school to access over 100 tried and tested science resources, with more added every month to keep science teaching fresh and topical.

  3. The resources and materials that teachers select – in a way that does not create unnecessary workload for staff – reflect the provider’s ambitious intentions for the course of study and clearly support the intent of a coherently planned curriculum…” The Whizz Pop Bang ten-minute spectacular science PowerPoints are designed to get a scientific discussion going in the classroom. These enable teachers to share deeper science topics into their lessons, with questions and answers included in the PowerPoint so teachers don’t have to spend time researching them. Our primary school resources have clear links to the science and reading curricula, they are of high quality and require minimal resources, helping to reduce teacher workload without skimping on the quality of the lesson and pupil’s learning.

  4. Teachers have good knowledge of the subject(s) and courses they teach. Leaders provide effective support for those teaching outside their main areas of expertise…” We know that not all teachers are science specialists, so with this in mind we include an age-appropriate scientific explanation on every lesson plan, with scientific terminology to expand children’s vocabulary. This increases teacher’s confidence and adds extra support for primary school teachers.

  5. “Teachers present subject matter clearly, promoting appropriate discussion about the subject matter they are teaching.”
    Our reading resources are taken from all issues of Whizz Pop Bang magazine and cover many different non-fiction genres (interviews, non-chronological reports, historical biographies, explanation texts and instructions), helping teachers to make cross-curricular links and promote relevant and thought-provoking discussions with pupils.

  6. “In primary schools, inspectors will always carry out a deep dive in reading…”
    Teachers love our reading resources as the content is current, inspiring and relevant, and linked to the reading curriculum. Teachers can download and print as many texts as required, allowing whole class reading or group reading. Our questions sheets relate to the reading curriculum and are differentiated. In all texts we help pupils to pronounce scientific words by breaking them down phonetically.

  7. “A rigorous approach to the teaching of reading develops learners’ confidence and enjoyment in reading. At the early stages of learning to read, reading materials are closely matched to learners’ phonics knowledge.”
    We offer a unique resource for schools, with new science and reading resources available every month to accompany each new issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine. Each issue is themed, which links well with topic-based learning in schools, as well as seasons and events.

Read the full Ofsted framework report here.

A subscription to Whizz Pop Bang magazine and resources is the perfect way to enhance your school’s curriculum, and meet key elements of Ofsted’s new guidelines.

Subscribe to Whizz Pop Bang for your school for:

  • Inspirational and topical science magazines delivered each month
  • Unlimited teacher log-ins to access downloadable science and reading resources
  • Prices from just £190 for the entire year

Visit our dedicated schools page, call us on 0330 2233 790 or email schools@whizzpopbang.com. Together we can inspire the scientists of the future!