Primary teaching resources for properties and changes of materials

Great news! Our latest resources to accompany the Explosive Science edition of Whizz Pop Bang are now available to download.

Not yet a subscriber to our downloadable teaching resources? Use the links below to subscribe for your school, or download some sample resources for FREE… 

Year 5 and P6 lesson pack

Year 5 and P6
Curriculum links: properties and changes of materials and properties and uses of substances. 
This lesson pack is a hands-on investigation where pupils will create their own safe chemical explosion. In small groups, pupils will plan their own fair test, changing one variable at a time to see if it alters the speed of the explosion.
This downloadable pack includes:

  •  A lesson plan complete with differentiation and links to the curriculum.
  • A PowerPoint presentation which explains different types of explosions and includes instructions for the investigation.
  •  A printable worksheet with a table and squared paper to draw the results in a line graph.

Simple to resource! The items you will need:

  • Vinegar
  • Bicarbonate of soda
  • Grip seal bags (like the ones grated cheese comes in)
  • Stopwatches
Year 2 and P3 fireworks reading comprehension

Fireworks reading comprehension
Year groups: Year 2 and P3
This explanation text, linking to the topics everyday materials and properties and uses of substances, explains how fireworks work. Each part of the firework is labelled with an expanded caption – hollow chamber, stick, fuse, time fuse, stars, burst charge and propellant.
The downloadable reading pack includes:

  • Two differentiated A3 reading spreads for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.
Year 3 and P4 reading comprehension

Cows
Year groups: Year 3 and P4
This non-chronological report text, linking to the topics animals including humans and biodiversity and interdependence, tells you everything you would like to know about cows. The text features: How they are explosive, why they affect climate change, what they eat, and explains what the term ‘chewing the cud’ means.
This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.
Year 4 and P5 reading comprehension

Interview with an explosions expert
Year groups: Year 4 and P5
An interview with an explosives expert, linking to the topics states of matter and properties and uses of substances. Kate Biberdorf brings chemistry to life through her explosive demonstrations. In this interview, she discusses what her job is, how she became so interested in explosions and the best thing about her job.
This downloadable reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.

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Watch some cooling towers being demolished!

Have you been reading about useful explosions in Whizz Pop Bang’s Explosive Science edition?

These gigantic towers were demolished in moments!

Watch explosives being used to demolish the cooling towers of an old power station here:

It’s the Didcot demolition in action!

Find out more in Whizz Pop Bang: Explosive Science, on sale now!

WIN Crayola Colour Explosion packs!

This month’s Whizz Pop Bang magazine is all about explosions so to celebrate, we’re giving away some arty kits that allow children to create explosions of colour!

Cover of Whizz Pop Bang magazine's new issue: KABOOM! Explosive Science to blow your mind!
The EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE issue of Whizz Pop Bang is packed with science that booms, bangs and bursts!

Create wild and surprising effects and watch as swirls of rainbow colour magically appear as you draw with this Crayola Colour Explosion set! The unique colour-reveal markers work with the special Colour Explosion paper to reveal hidden swirls of rainbow colours and amazing designs. Each set includes lots of multicoloured pages, two colour-reveal marker pens and a stencil.

We’ve got ten sets to give away to ten lucky Whizz Pop Bang fans! Just answer this question in the comments to be in with a chance of winning:

Which of these words can be used to describe a horse with irregular patches of two colours on its coat?

  1. Pie face
  2. Pie crust
  3. Piebald

This competition closes at midnight on 30th November 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

Primary teaching resources for coding

Great news! Our newest resources are available to download, and they make the perfect accompaniment to the awesome Coding capers edition of Whizz Pop Bang.

Not yet a subscriber to Whizz Pop Bang downloadable teaching resources? Start a subscription today!

Year 3/4 and P5/P6 coding lesson pack

In this pack for years 3/4, and P4/P5, pupils will learn who invented the first computers. They will find out how important it is to give clear, concise instructions for a computer to follow. Pupils will learn how to use conditionals and variables within their code, and the importance of debugging.

This pack includes:

  • A lesson plan linked to the curriculum.
  • A PowerPoint presentation, which explains how code is written.
  • Instructions for a variables obstacle course.
  • Coding a jam sandwich activity.
  • A printable silly science coding rescue game.
Year 2 and P3 Moths reading comprehension

This non-chronological report for year 2 and P3, linking to the topics of living things and habitats and biodiversity and interdependence, investigates the flying insects, moths. The text explains the difference between moths and butterflies, why they have coloured scales on their wings and how they turn from a caterpillar into a moth.

The downloadable reading pack includes:

  • Two differentiated A3 reading spreads for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.
Year 4 and P5 Historical Scientist Ada Lovelace

This biography text for year 4 and P5 on Ada Lovelace explains how she wrote the first computer program more than 100 years before computers were invented! Every year in October, on Ada Lovelace Day, people celebrate Ada and other amazing women in science, technology, engineering and maths.

This downloadable non-fiction reading pack includes:

  • An A3 reading spread for you to print.
  • Reading comprehension question and answer sheets, differentiated using our magnifying glasses key (on the bottom right). One magnifying glass indicates easier and two means harder.

Join our Facebook group for updates, science news, competitions and even some freebies!
 

Oobleck in action!

Have you been reading the interview with Kate Biberdorf in Whizz Pop Bang’s KABOOM: EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE issue where she tells us how to make oobleck? Or perhaps you just want to watch an oobleck slime video? Here’s the non-Newtonian, gloopy, sticky, drippy stuff in action!

The Slow Mo Guys made some oobleck (check out our recipe below), coloured it red, put it on a speaker, turned on some music and filmed the gloopy fluid dancing. It looks unreal!

Wondering: what is oobleck? Kate Biberdorf says:

“If you mix water and cornflour in a bowl, you can make this freaky non-Newtonian fluid. It’s one of the craziest things to hold because the oobleck will drip through your fingers even though the solid feels like a solid.”

Here is the Whizz Pop Bang recipe for oobleck:

Mix 225 g of cornflour with around 230 ml of water (and a few drops of food colouring, if you like). This will create a goo that feels liquid when you handle it gently, but solid if you hit it with a spoon.

Watch the whole video here:

Find out more in Whizz Pop Bang: Explosive Science, on sale now!

COMPETITION CLOSED – WIN nature tattoos!

WIN ONE OF FIVE NATURE TATTOO SETS!

Do you know a mini entomologist who would like to show off their love of minibeasts? These books feature beautiful, accurately illustrated tattoos of real insects (that can be cut out, stuck on to skin and washed off) alongside stacks of brilliant bug facts! 

Five lucky Whizz Pop Bang fans will win CREEPY, CRAWLY TATTOO BUGS and FLUTTERY, FRIENDLY TATTOO BUTTERFLIES AND OTHER INSECTS – that’s two books, or 141 tattoos, for each winner!  

Answer this question in the comments to be in with a chance of winning:

Which one is a type of insect?

  1. Praying mantis
  2. Spraying mantis
  3. Neighing mantis

This competition closes at midnight on 31st October 2019. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms

Free science activity: make an air-powered rocket!

Did you know it’s World Space Week?

 🌎🌖 World Space Week runs from the 4th-10th October, and is an international celebration of all things space. It focuses on science and technology and its role in the past, present and future of mankind, a way of not only promoting the work that countries do together to explore space, but also how important space technology is to life on Earth. This year’s theme is “The Moon: Gateway to the Stars.”

To help you celebrate, try our FREE air-powered rocket activity – keeping scrolling to find a download containing all you need to print and cut your own rocket!

Awesomely amazing plants and animals!

Have you been reading 10 Awesomely Amazing Explosions in the Wild in Whizz Pop Bang: Explosive Science? Or are you intrigued by bombardier beetles and curious about squirting cucumbers? Then scroll on, because we have got some incredible videos for you!

Find out more about awesomely amazing explosions in the wild in Whizz Pop Bang’s EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE issue!

From spreading their seeds to escaping from predators, there are all sorts of reasons for wildlife to burst, boom and blast. See some of these incredible exploding creatures and plants in action here! 

When under threat, Bombardier beetles mix two chemicals together in its abdomen, causing an explosive reaction that fires out jets of boiling toxic liquid. This makes a predator vomit the beetle out to safety!

Watch what happens when an unlucky toad eats a bombardier beetle, capable of shooting out jets of boiling toxic liquid:

This video shows the poisonous squirting cucumber detaching from its stem and firing seeds explosively at the touch of a finger:

You wouldn’t want to find a squirting cucumber in your salad – it’s poisonous!

The dung-dwelling pilobolus fungus uses a ‘squirt gun’ mechanism to fire its spores far and wide. The spores that land on plants are eaten by cows and then pooed out, and the cycle begins again!

See pilobolus fungus’s ‘squirt gun’ mechanism in action here.

The dynamite tree has toxic, pumpkin-shaped pods that explode with a loud ‘boom’, shooting out seeds at speeds of over 200 km/h!

Read more about exploding ants and termites, pistol shrimp, Himalayan Balsam, hairy bittercress exploding beached whales and more in 10 Awesomely Amazing Explosions in the Wild in Whizz Pop Bang: Explosive Science, on sale now!

A primary science coordinator’s guide to an Ofsted deep dive into science

The new Ofsted framework for primary schools has shifted the focus away from data and put more emphasis on a broad, engaging curriculum. This means that Ofsted inspectors are now shining more of a spotlight on science. So, what will Ofsted inspectors want to know when they take a ‘deep dive’ into science at your primary school?


Would you like help to improve primary science in your school?


A few primary science coordinators have shared their experiences of the Ofsted inspections under the new framework, and we have to say, the inspections seem very thorough! To help take away the fear and uncertainty for science coordinators, we’ve put together this short summary to show you what to expect in an Ofsted deep dive into science, and we also share our top tips of what you can put in your coordinator file.

1.Curriculum coverage

Make sure you know what each year group is teaching and how these topics progress across the years. It’s really important you understand what is covered in EYFS; if this isn’t your area of expertise ask your colleagues in FS2. The National Curriculum states clearly what each year group should cover. If this is followed, you will ensure there is progression across your school. Although it is tempting to buy into a scheme, this can be very expensive; it’s perfectly possible to teach science well without one. Here is a link to a useful progression on enquiry skills.

2. Staff training and support for new staff

Keep a list of all CPD that members of staff have attended. Make sure it also includes any support that you have given them, even the times when a member of staff has asked you for advice and you have pointed them in the direction of a useful website or resource. As part of the deep dive into science, Ofsted inspectors will be scrutinising the way in which teachers explain science to their pupils. It’s therefore really important to support the less confident members of staff. Ask the staff to tell you if there are any areas that they are required to teach in science that they are not sure about. This will help you to prioritise their CPD. Don’t forget to keep a record of any staff meeting you have run and a copy of handouts you have given to teachers.

3. Scientific vocabulary

It is important that pupils use the correct scientific terminology, and Ofsted will be looking for this in lessons and in pupils’ books. Encourage staff to have a science vocabulary wall in their classroom, or word mats for the pupils to have in their books at the start of each topic. Pupils asking and answering questions is a key part of their learning. Here is a useful document shared by a teacher with the science curriculum mapped through ‘big questions’.

4. Book scrutiny

When you look at the books, make sure the whole school is recording learning objectives at the beginning of each piece of work and that the pupil activity relates to it. Make sure there is clear progression and all the content links to your overview.

5. Curriculum links

Make a list of all of the ways that your school teaches science through other subjects such as reading, maths or history. Collect a couple of examples of lesson plans or pupils’ work for evidence.

6. Resourcing and trips

Make a note of any science trips that take place and how they fit into that year’s science coverage. Consider the resources needed for each topic so you can be sure that you, as the science coordinator, have made the appropriate provision.

7. Action plan

Make sure your action plan is up to date. If there is an area that is a weakness, it’s important to be honest about it. It’s far better to identify the issue and state the steps you are putting into place to resolve it, rather than to ignore the problem.

8. Lesson observations

If you haven’t already, make sure that you find the time to observe a science lesson with a member of SLT; ask for this to be part of your performance management. There is a chance you will be expected to observe science lessons with the Ofsted inspector. It’s better to have had the opportunity to have done this with a friendly face first!


If you’d like to improve science at your school, Whizz Pop Bang magazine and the downloadable teaching resources can help:

  • Downloadable science lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, hands-on investigations and science reading comprehensions written by primary school teachers
  • Linked to the National Curriculum, ensuring correct coverage.
  • All resources are year group specific, ensuring progression between the years
  • Cross-curricular links to other subjects such as English, maths, history, geography, design and technology and PSHE.

Prices from as little as £190 per year for a copy of Whizz Pop Bang magazine through the post each month and whole-school access to our ever-growing library of downloadable teaching resources, with unlimited teacher logins. Click here to find out more.