What age is Whizz Pop Bang for?

What age range is Whizz Pop Bang magazine for? We’re often asked this question, and the answer is it really depends on the child. As a guide we say our magazines are written and designed for 6 to 12-year-olds, however the best way to see if it’s suitable for your child is to have a browse before you buy! It’s also worth having a read of some of the reviews from parents and grandparents who tell us the ages of the children they subscribe for.

Have a flick through our Planetary Adventures issue here 👇🏾

If you have any questions about Whizz Pop Bang visit our FAQ page, send us an email or call us on 0330 2233790. We’re always happy to hear from our customers!

StartUps awards 2018, highly commended in the Women in Business Category!

StartUps award women in business highly commended

Whoop whoop! Exciting times for Whizz Pop Bang!!! Firstly we’re thrilled to announce Whizz Pop Bang founder Jenny won highly commended at the StartUps Awards 2018 in the Women in Business category!! 👏🏼 🏆 🤩

AND Jenny appeared on BBC4 on the Tomorrow’s World Live show as one of the many people inspired by the program. Cracking week for Whizz Pop Bang!

Awesomely honest reviews for Whizz Pop Bang…

Boys with their SPY issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

Your reviews and feedback mean the world to us, so thank you to all these families who have taken the time to share their thoughts on Whizz Pop Bang, the awesomely amazing science magazine for kids!

“My 9yr old daughter has received her first copy and is thrilled with it. Excellent magazine. Word of warning though, I do unfortunately appear to have inadvertently learned stuff too due to her constant verbal updates whilst reading it. Be warned, it could happen to you!” 🤯
Gemma Dodgson

“I love the fact that women engineers and scientists feature so prominently. I hadn’t realised this was the case when I first subscribed, and originally subscribed simply because it looked like a fun way to get a greater exposure to science, but it really stands out for me. I also love the use of proper scientific terminology because it familiarises children to this language and makes science more accessible.”
Cat

“My daughter starts asking a week before it pops through our letterbox when will it be here. Best birthday present she’s ever received.”
Nicky Doyle

“My son said “Whizz Pop Bang is the best magazine ever, I love the jokes especially”
Ella Weaver

“My son reads it cover to cover! More than once! He even refers back to back copies. (The pile on the bed is huge!)”
Ed Bickerstaffe

“Fantastic magazine and helps so much with our daughters love of science”
Tracey Cook

“My daughter loves the magazine. She is really excited every month when it arrives. She wants to be a scientist when she grows up so that she can ‘change the world’ and that says it all really!”
Anna Hodgin

“We are a home educating family and I choose not to use the discount because I believe that it is already great value for money. We (age range from 34 – 5) all get excited when Whizz Pop Bang comes through the door. It gives us the opportunity to explore things/people that we may not have heard of before in a style that all of us can understand and use as a base to explore articles further. I personally enjoy ‘Animal antics’, ‘Interview with a science hero’, ‘how stuff works’, Ten awesomely amazing’ and Sensational scientists.”
Leech family

“It is an awesome magazine. As a mum I like that you email me a supply list before the magazine arrives. All three of my children love it ages 6, 13 and 15.”
Michelle

“I’m also a Childminder so I’ve kept all the copies so they can access all the back issues when topics arise at school. I imagine that the babies I mind will look at these in the years to come as well as my grandchildren.”
Caroline Francis

“My child took a copy to school and the teacher was so delighted he said he’d buy W.P.B too! 😁”
E. Yates

“I have been very impressed with WPB. My boys love receiving their own post (in such vibrant and environmentally friendly packaging) each month and can’t wait to open it. The experiments and articles are pitched at the perfect level and inspire them to think about topics that they might not otherwise come across. I will be continuing the subscription for their little sister when she is old enough, too.”
Rebecca Wale

“Whizz Pop Bang is an excellent resource that I have recommended to several parents and teachers. My kids look forward to receiving the magazine every month, and my son is currently reading this month’s out loud to me. Please keep up the good work!”
Cathy Campbell

“I’m an archaeological scientist. I want my son to understand why I love what I do; that science can be beautiful, and awe-inspiring, and fun. Your magazine forms a central part of this nefarious propaganda machine, so … thank you!”
Chloe Duckworth

“I love the accessible feel and the range of topics covered each month. I really appreciate the advance warning emails so I can prepare for forthcoming experiments”
Jo Jenks

“Our daughter loves receiving Whizz Pop Bang looks forward to it each month. She’s excited about science and a passionate feminist so it’s great that the magazine provides role models of women in STEM. We’re also impressed with the decision to use paper envelopes rather than plastic wrappers. Thank you.”
Sarah Giles

Whizz Pop Bang science and reading resources for schools

new science and reading resources for schools

New Whizz Pop Bang teaching resources for schools

One of the key aims for Whizz Pop Bang is to help as many children as possible to enjoy the awesome world of science. So we’ve created a growing library of top-quality downloadable Whizz Pop Bang lesson plans and reading resources for schools to make science fun and engaging for children and teachers alike.

What are the resources for schools?

Our Whizz Pop Bang school resources have been written by primary teachers in conjunction with science experts and they all link to the national curriculum…

  • Differentiated lesson plans
  • Simple hands-on investigations using household items
  • Interactive PowerPoint presentations to guide the lessons
  • Guiding reading texts and comprehension questions*
  • Science games

* Science texts and comprehensions, written by teachers, link to the English reading curriculum. They include How Stuff Works, interviews with real scientists and stories of sensational scientists from the past.

Subscriptions to the resources are for the whole school, with as many teacher log-ins as required.

How much does it cost? 

We know budgets are tighter than ever, so we’re offering schools a 50% discount on the resources until 31st December 2018. Whole-school access to the downloadable resources, along with 4 magazines in the post each month costs just £225 for the whole year with unlimited teacher loginsFor an average-sized school of 300 children, that’s just 75p per pupil per year.

To calculate the price per pupil for your school, use our online pricing tool at whizzpopbang.com/schools (prices exclude VAT).

Top five reasons for schools to subscribe to Whizz Pop Bang:

  • Accessible content for classrooms, libraries, Science Week and STEM clubs
  • Written by expert teachers and science writers
  • Linked to the science and reading curricula
  • Bursting with rich practical science experiments that are simple and cheap to do
  • Gives teachers the confidence to deliver accurate science lessons

 

We’ve got five copies of The Bacteria Book to giveaway!

Bacteria book competition

The good, the bad and the ugly, bacteria are everywhere! Learn all about gross germs, vile viruses and funky fungi in this fascinating book written by the aptly named Steve Mould, published by Dorling Kindersley.

To be in with a chance of winning one of these books simply answer this question:

Where can bacteria be found?

a) Antarctic ice

b) Clouds

c) Ocean trenches

d) All of the above

Hint: the answer is in the Bug-tastic Bacteria issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine!

To enter comment below with your answer by midnight on 30th November 2018. By entering this competition you agree to our terms and conditions.

Solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie performing at the Olympic Games 2012

In our Christmas 2018 issue, Jingle Bell Rock, we interview solo percussionist Evelyn Glennie who lost her hearing at the age of eight. Here she is playing the Aluphone at the Olympic Games opening ceremony in 2012…

To read the interview and find out more about Evelyn and how she plays music by feeling vibrations, buy this issue from our online shop for £3.99 with free UK delivery.

10 Awesomely Amazing Musical Instruments!

Inside the Christmas Jingle Bell Rock issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, we discover 10 awesomely amazing musical instruments; from the bizarre instruments made of fruit and vegetables, to this rather magical instrument that is played without even touching it… the theremin.

The theremin is a musical instrument that is played without being touched. Err, what? How does that work?! The electronic instrument uses an electromagnetic field around two antenna, and the musician disrupts this field with their hands to create a spooky sound. Watch this video of Ennio Morricone to discover the mysterious sounds this instrument can make 👇🏾

To see all the weird and wonderful musical instruments featured in this issue of Whizz Pop Bang magazine, order from our online shop. Magazines cost just £3.99 with FREE UK delivery.

Listen to the vegetable orchestra!

Yes, you’ve read that correctly, you are about to listen to an orchestra playing instruments made out of vegetables!

Worldwide one of a kind, the Vegetable Orchestra performs on instruments made of fresh vegetables. The Vegetable Orchestra was founded in 1998. Based in Vienna, the Vegetable Orchestra plays concerts in all over the world.

There are no musical boundaries for the Vegetable Orchestra. The most diverse music styles fuse here – contemporary music, beat-oriented House tracks, experimental Electronic, Free Jazz, Noise, Dub, Clicks’n’Cuts – the musical scope of the ensemble expands consistently, and recently developed vegetable instruments and their inherent sounds often determine the direction.

The Q&A page is a good place to find out more about this wonderfully creative bunch!

Check out more unusual musical instruments in the JINGLE BELLS ROCK issue of Whizz Pop Bang, the awesome science magazine for kids!

 

Get ready for out of this world SPACE TRAVEL with Whizz Pop Bang!

What’s inside the next awesome issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine? We’ve got an awesome interview with ESA astronaut Tim Peake to read and listen to, in-depth news of BepiColombo’s mission to Mercury AND build your own rockets! 🚀

Subscribe by Thursday 4th October for your mini rocket scientist here.

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids SPACE TRAVEL

Royal Institution logo

News on the Royal Institution Christmas lectures 2018

Prof Alice Roberts Royal Institution Christmas lectures
Prof Alice Roberts who will be answering the question ‘Who are we?’ at the Royal Institution Christmas lectures 2018

Who are we?

Where do we come from?

What does it mean to be human?

This year Prof Alice Roberts will take us on a fascinating journey for the Royal Institution of Great Britain Christmas lectures to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I?

Each one of us is unique. And yet there are many more similarities between us than differences. We share about 99.4% of our genetic sequence in common with other people. In that small genetic difference resides much of the wonderful variety we see in humans today. How do we use the similarities and differences between us to construct our individual identities?

In the 2018 CHRISTMAS LECTURES from the Royal Institution, scientist, author and TV presenter Alice Roberts will take us on a journey to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I? 

Tickets to the filming of the Christmas lectures are available through a ballot in September, open to Royal Institution Members and Patrons and UK registered schools only. To find out how to join the Ri and apply for tickets to this once in a lifetime show, visit the Ri website.

About the lectures

From our hidden similarities to a fruit fly, to the story of the emergence and global spread of our own species, to the interplay between genes and environment in creating individual differences, Alice will uncover our shared evolutionary past and ask challenging ethical questions about what the future holds.

Lecture 1 explores our amazingly beastly past, and through surprising similarities to our animal ancestors – from the bones and body plans we share with fish and horses to the genes we share with a fruit fly – we discover our true place in the biological tree of life.

Lecture 2 examines connections with our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, and traces our evolutionary journey – from a common ancestor with those apes, to the emergence of our species, Homo sapiens, and the amazing colonisation of the world by our Stone Age ancestors. What are the essential characteristics that makes us human? And how did out species become so successful?

Lecture 3 unpicks genetic variations to find out how the differences between us are created by an interplay between genes and environment, asks whether we can find evidence for natural selection and adaptation in our genomes today, and explores how our DNA may hold clues to future health and risk of disease. We can already change the genes of crops to give them traits we see as desirable, but could it be possible for humans?  And in this Brave New World, where do we draw the line?

The Lectures will be broadcast on BBC Four in December.

Alice, who is Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham, said: “The study of biology and our own evolutionary past gives us a really interesting way to understand who we are, today. I’m looking forward to sparking some young imaginations with this amazing area of science. 

“As well as providing us with knowledge about our past and present, though, new technologies can confront us with difficult decisions about what we should do in the future. 

“So I’ll also be asking some challenging questions about what identity means today, and what advances in genetics in particular might mean for us as a species.”