WIN The Cosmic Book of Space, Aliens and Beyond!

It’s your chance to win the galaxy’s most wacky activity book. Grab your pencils, Earthlings. Let our mission commence!

3, 2, 1…blast off! Are you ready to journey out of this world to discover what lies beyond? From space pirates and surfing aliens to galactic shark ships and mysterious planets, strap in, put on your alien mask and zoom through the stars for the ultimate cosmic activity adventure. We’ve got FIVE copies of The Cosmic Book of Space, Aliens and Beyond! to give away!

To win one of FIVE copies, just answer this question in the comments:

Which of these IS NOT one of Jupiter’s moons?

A Callisto
B Europe
C Ganymede

This competition closes at midnight on 31st January 2022. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms-and-conditions


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Teaching Forces in year 5

Are you looking for planning resources to teach forces in Year 5? Here’s how you can use our new downloadable marble run resource to create a memorable lesson that produces the sticky knowledge Ofsted will be looking for…

Where to start?

It’s hard to teach about forces as children can’t easily see what is happening. Before they start investigating and experimenting, it’s important they are armed with the knowledge and vocabulary they need through watching video clips or reading suitable materials, as stated by Ofsted. Once they have this scientific understanding, it’s so important that pupils still have practical hands-on lessons so they can spot what is happening. Our knowledge organiser is a great aid to help them use the correct terminology in practical lessons.

How should they investigate forces?

Our marble run lesson pack gets children to experiment with slowing down marbles in a marble run by changing the angles and adding friction. Pupils will learn a lot by investigating and applying the knowledge they have already acquired about gravity, friction and air resistance. Pupils will be learning the most when they are altering their marble runs and experimenting with trial and error. During this time, stop groups and ask them questions, encouraging them to use scientific vocabulary in their answers. Verbalising what they are seeing and doing will help to produce sticky knowledge.

How should the lesson be recorded?

Should pupils record every step of a practical lesson? In my experience, no, as this kills the enjoyment and does not reflect what they have learned. However, there are benefits to revising learning to help the knowledge stick. Revisiting the lesson the next day is beneficial. If you need evidence in their books for a looming book scrutiny, then take a photo and ask them to annotate it with expanded captions, explaining what happens to the marble at each point of the run. Or if you don’t need written evidence, get them to video their run and then narrate what is happening over the top.

Guided reading

To help consolidate pupils’ learning, why not introduce some forces-themed reading into your English sessions? Download our fascinating reading comprehension on Sir Isaac Newton; his laws of motion and his theory of gravity changed how we see the universe.

Whizz Pop Bang magazine and teaching resources are brilliant ways to enhance your school’s science teaching:

  • We provide downloadable science lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, hands-on investigations and science reading comprehensions written by primary school teachers.
  • Whizz Pop Bang teaching resources link to the National Curriculum, ensuring correct coverage.
  • All of our resources are year group specific, ensuring progression between the years.
  • We make cross-curricular links to other subjects, such as English, Maths, History, Geography, Art, Design and Technology and PSHE.

Prices from as little as £190 per year for a copy of Whizz Pop Bang magazine through the post each month and whole-school access to our ever-growing library of downloadable teaching resources, with unlimited teacher logins.

We’ve also have an individual membership option so teachers and home educators can access all of our amazing downloadable resources for just £20 for the whole year


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Teaching the unit states of matter in year 4

Are you looking for planning resources for teaching states of matter in year 4? Here’s how you can use our new downloadable teaching resources to easily create memorable lessons that produce the sticky knowledge Ofsted will be looking for…

Where to start?  

It states clearly in the National Curriculum that this unit is about understanding the difference between solids, liquids and gases, how materials change state when they are heated and cooled, and at what temperature this happens. It also includes evaporation in the water cycle. It’s important to remember this unit does not include heating where a chemical change occurs, such as baking or burning.

We have several lesson packs which cover these objectives:

Gloopy slime

Your pupils will make oobleck and observe how it turns from a solid to a liquid.

Chocolate investigation

A comparative investigation where pupils will test and find out which type of chocolate melts the fastest.

Make a bottled jungle

An investigation into why it rains in rainforests and jungles. Pupils will make their own miniature jungle and watch how it looks after itself!

How to evidence your practical lessons

If your planning isn’t enough evidence, pupils could use the Keynote app on an iPad and record themselves describing their investigation or activity. If you need evidence in their books, you could print a photo form the lesson and during morning work the next day, pupils could label and annotate it. This would mean that they go back over their learning from the day before, helping the knowledge to stick. Do pupils need to write each step of an experiment? In my experience, asking pupils to write down everything they have done kills the learning. Choose one part from each investigation; that way they will do it well and it will enhance learning. Our knowledge organisers are really helpful with spellings and helping pupils to remember key concepts and vocabulary.

How to embed science across the curriculum

There are also lots of ways to embed the pupil’s science learning in your school day. Using science texts in guided reading or whole-class reading sessions is an easy way for children to delve further into the subject matter and acquire more knowledge. We have several reading comprehension packs for year 4 linking to the topic states of matter:

We also have a bank of spectacular science images that are perfect for promoting discussion. They feature a striking scientific image, along with a couple of questions. As you click through the PowerPoint presentation, the answers to the questions will be revealed. Pupils should try to answer the questions as you go. The presentations to use for the unit states of matter are called ‘dry ice’, ‘dancing cornflour’ and ‘stunning snowflakes’. It only takes ten minutes so it can slot into those awkward times in the school day; for example, straight after lunch while you are waiting for everyone to come in.

Whizz Pop Bang magazine and teaching resources are brilliant ways to enhance your school’s science teaching:

  • We provide downloadable science lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, hands-on investigations and science reading comprehensions written by primary school teachers.
  • Whizz Pop Bang teaching resources link to the National Curriculum, ensuring correct coverage.
  • All of our resources are year group specific, ensuring progression between the years.
  • We make cross-curricular links to other subjects, such as English, Maths, History, Geography, Art, Design and Technology and PSHE.

Prices from as little as £190 per year for a copy of Whizz Pop Bang magazine through the post each month and whole-school access to our ever-growing library of downloadable teaching resources, with unlimited teacher logins.

We’ve also just launched a new individual membership option so teachers and home educators can access all of our amazing downloadable resources for just £20 for the whole year


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COMPETITION CLOSED: WIN a National Geographic Ultimate Gemstone Dig Kit!

Uncover hours of fun with this Ultimate Gemstone Dig Kit from National Geographic!

The extra-large dig brick has 20 amazing gemstones hidden inside. Your kids will love discovering them all using the included dig tool and brush and then get a close-up view of each with the magnifying glass. A full-colour learning guide provides fascinating facts about each gemstone, and easy-to-follow instructions make excavating each gemstone a whole lot of fun! Gemstones include two types of agate, three types of quartz, tiger’s eye, snowflake obsidian, amethyst, aragonite, aventurine, hematite, desert rose, a geode piece, green fluorite, pyrite, red jasper, sodalite, turquenite, blue calcite, and labradorite.


This National Geographic Ultimate Gemstone Dig Kit is available from very.co.uk!

To win one of THREE kits, answer this question in the comments:

What is the hardest gemstone?

A Topaz
B Ruby
C Diamond

This competition closes at midnight on 31st December 2021. For full terms and conditions visit whizzpopbang.com/terms-and-conditions


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Teaching shadows in year 3

Teaching the unit ‘light’ in year 3 builds the foundations for children’s understanding of Earth and Space in year 5. Pupils are aware of their own shadows from an early age, but do they understand why shadows get bigger and smaller or change shape? Here at Whizz Pop Bang, our experienced primary teacher has written a lesson pack containing a shadow investigation. Pupils will work in small groups and observe, measure, and record the length and width of a shadow.

“The children had great fun taking part in the shadows lesson. They were immersed in the activity not only developing their scientific knowledge but using mathematical skills and working co-operatively in a group” Natalie Walters – Year 3 teacher

The lesson pack contains:

  • A lesson plan linked to the national curriculum
  • A PowerPoint presentation
  • Instructions
  • Differentiated results table

Great news! You don’t need any specialised equipment, apart from torches (these should be in your science cupboard already!)

Shadow Investigation lesson pack

Whizz Pop Bang magazine and teaching resources are brilliant ways to enhance your school’s science teaching:

  • We provide downloadable science lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, hands-on investigations and science reading comprehensions written by primary school teachers.
  • Whizz Pop Bang teaching resources link to the National Curriculum, ensuring correct coverage.
  • All of our resources are year group specific, ensuring progression between the years.
  • We make cross-curricular links to other subjects, such as English, Maths, History, Geography, Art, Design and Technology and PSHE.

Prices from as little as £190 per year for a copy of Whizz Pop Bang magazine through the post each month and whole-school access to our ever-growing library of downloadable teaching resources, with unlimited teacher logins

We’ve also just launched a new individual membership option so teachers and home educators can access all of our amazing downloadable resources for just £20 for the whole year


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Look who’s talking

Very few mammals can imitate speech, but scientists in the Netherlands have found that baby seals just a few weeks old can change the pitch of their voices to make themselves heard above other noises. This suggests that seals may be the best species to help us understand the mystery of speech.

Recently, researchers at St Andrew’s University taught a seal to sing the Star Wars theme song!

Photo credit: John O’Connor


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