Helping children in Nepal to enjoy science

We have one simple aim for Whizz Pop Bang, and that’s to help as many children as possible to enjoy the wonderful world of science.

A few months ago a man called Brian Mildenhall, who works for a charity in Nepal, phoned and asked if we could donate some magazines for the children he helps. Brian works for a charity called Freedom Kit Bags which was set up to help end period poverty in Nepal. As well as supplying sanitary wear for women and girls, the team behind Freedom Kit Bags deliver education too.

Brian took a box of Whizz Pop Bang magazines on his most recent trip out to Nepal, and just last week he sent us these heart-warming photos of the children reading them at school. We’re all so touched to see our magazines in the hands of Nepalese children and teachers, helping them to read English and enjoy science. Thank you Brian and team for doing what you do! ❤️👍🏾🧠

International women and girls in science day!

Big shout out to Whizz Pop Bang girls today – it’s international women and girls in science day 👩🏽‍🔬🎉👨🏼‍🔬👏🏾 We’re hugely proud to be inspiring scientists of the future… girls & boys!
 
Thanks to these two super scientists from Shaw Ridge primary school for sending in their rendition of the periodic table song, you’ve got amazing memories!👇🏿

WIN! FReNeTiC the awesome new word game for science-lovers!

FReNeTiC competition prize

To celebrate the official launch of 150 years of the Periodic Table we’re giving away this brilliant brand new game FReNeTiC

FReNeTiC is the word game frenzy that pits players againt the clock – and the elements! Racing to make words from symbols of the Periodic Table, you score by adding together the atomic numbers of the elements you use… perfect for science, maths and word lovers!

To enter simply answer the question below by midnight on 10th February. Full terms and conditions on our website.

One of the elements in the periodic table is named after a famous female scientist, is it…
a) Margaret Curry
b) Mary Carey
c) Marie Curie

Go!!! 👇🏾👇🏾👇🏾

10 Awesomely Amazing recycling heroes!

Whizz Pop Bang magazine recycling heroes

Big shout out to our 10 Awesomely Amazing recycling heroes in our RUBBISH SCIENCE issue!

♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️♻️

1. Melati and Isabel Wijsen who set up Bye Bye Plastic Bags
2. Sammie Vance with her recycled plastic buddy benches
3. Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu who set up soleRebels designing shoes from old tyres
4. Ryan Hickman, age 9 runs his own recycling company
5. Aaron Westbrook 3D prints prosthetic limbs from recycled plastic
6. Anna Bullus who set up Gumdrop ltd making shoes with pink soles from recycled gum
7. Esther Bird campaigned to stop single-use plastics being used at her school
8. Julia Bray, Ashton Cofer and Luke and Natalie Clay converted styrofoam cups into activated carbon
9. Zymal Umer set up Zee Bags to make gift bags from recycled newspaper
10. Amy and Ella Meek from Kids Against Plastic campaign to help families, cafes and councils to be ‘Plastic Clever’

So inspiring to see so many kids taking the initiative, the future’s looking greener everyone! 👍🏽

Christmas jingle competition winners!

Well done to all our Jingle Bell Rock competition winners! Here are their totally awesome songs…

Ella Amott singing her winning song with her mini handmade guitar 🎸🎶🎄

Ella won an Electronic Music Inventor Kit from Littlebits.com

Ella Amott with her own version of Jingle Bells

And these four readers who each won a Booms, Bangs and Fizzes kit from johnadams.co.uk

Holly Brown’s song called ‘Jingle, jingle’

Ollie Jamieson’s song

Sebastian Hughes’s song

SNOUTY THE SOLAR POWERED REINDEER

Elijah Summers’s song

It might not be Christmas anymore but this issue is packed full of musical science fun for any time of the year! Buy this JINGLE BELL ROCK issue for just £3.99 inc UK delivery here.

SPECTACULAR SCIENCE: Glass Frog Heartbeat

These extraordinary tree-dwelling frogs live mostly in tropical areas of Central and South America. Most are tiny, ranging in size from 3 cm to 7.5 cm. They are usually green in colour, except for their undersides, where the skin is transparent. This makes it easy to see their internal organs, including their beating hearts!


Unlike tree frogs, glass frogs have forward-facing eyes. They have excellent eyesight for hunting prey at night.

ECO NEWS: Greta Thunberg’s speech at UN Climate Change COP24 Conference

A 15-year-old girl took world leaders to task over their failure to act on climate change. Speaking at a United Nations climate conference in December, Greta Thunberg, a young climate activist from Sweden, told climate change negotiators they were “not mature enough to tell it like it is.” She accused them of focusing on economic growth because they were “too scared of being unpopular”. “But I don’t care about being popular,” said Greta. “I care about climate justice and the living planet.”

Greta was eight years old when she first learnt about climate change, and she was shocked to see how little was being done about it. Since then she has campaigned for adults to put our planet’s future before making money.

Map of Whizz Pop Bang families across the UK!

Whizz Pop Bang subscribers in UK

Having attended the British Science Association Diversity in STEM APPG meeting about regional disparity, we wanted to see how far and wide our readers are spread across the UK.

As you can see from this image, we have Whizz Pop Bang subscribers everywhere! We’re thrilled to see just how far and wide our readership spreads; with children and their families in the Shetlands, Outer Hebrides, Orkney Islands, Isles of Scilly and many parts of Wales enjoying our magazine. And it doesn’t stop here, we have subscribers worldwide and our aims for 2019 are to grow our international readership to reach many more children, both at home and in schools.

Whizz Pop Bang eco policy

Whizz Pop Bang magazine Eco hero icon

As an educational magazine focusing on science, we take our environmental responsibility very seriously. We’re a small independent publisher, which means we have control at each stage of the process – from design to production, through to distribution. We don’t sell to newsstands, high street shops or supermarkets, so we never sell on a sale or return basis (where often, only the cover would be returned and the rest of the magazine is destroyed). Extra copies are held in stock here at WPB HQ, to be sold as back issues. We sometimes receive magazines from the printers which have been slightly damaged in transit, so we donate these to breakfast clubs in deprived areas and hospices for children who are too poorly to go to school.

Every month we report on environmental issues in the news, highlighting eco heroes and how children and their families can help reduce their environmental impact. We have a regular feature called Emmi’s Eco Club, exploring environmental issues in a fun and creative way, encouraging our young readers to be proactive in reducing, re-using and recycling. We are also very careful about the items required for our experiments, which will be inexpensive, household items. For example, we suggest using alternatives to plastic straws and encourage people to buy eco balloons.

Whizz Pop Bang magazines are printed in the UK, using only paper from FSC/PEFC certified suppliers. Our magazines are delivered in paper envelopes, which can be recycled.

Are you looking for ways to help your children learn more about how they can be more environmentally friendly? Read on!

We’re huge fans of Kids Against Plastic, a campaign set-up by sisters Amy and Ella Meek, aged 15 and 13. These two are amazing, their drive and determination to change people’s behaviour is so inspiring!

“Not long ago we came across the UN’s Global Goals and got inspired to do our bit for the planet, and after finding out about the negative effect single-use plastic is having on the environment, we launched the Kids Against Plastic campaign.”

They have three key aims to help people avoid single-use plastics through EDUCATION (learning) and ACTION (doing):

  • Raise awareness and understanding of the problems caused by plastic misuse
  • Encourage and support others to become ‘Plastic Clever’ and reduce single-use plastics
  • Empower children and young people to believe they can make a difference

Follow Amy and Ella and find out what they’re doing to help us reduce our reliance on single-use plastics.