StartUps awards 2018, highly commended in the Women in Business Category!

StartUps award women in business highly commended

Whoop whoop! Exciting times for Whizz Pop Bang!!! Firstly we’re thrilled to announce Whizz Pop Bang founder Jenny won highly commended at the StartUps Awards 2018 in the Women in Business category!! 👏🏼 🏆 🤩

AND Jenny appeared on BBC4 on the Tomorrow’s World Live show as one of the many people inspired by the program. Cracking week for Whizz Pop Bang!

Awesomely honest reviews for Whizz Pop Bang…

Boys with their SPY issue of Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids

Your reviews and feedback mean the world to us, so thank you to all these families who have taken the time to share their thoughts on Whizz Pop Bang, the awesomely amazing science magazine for kids!

“My 9yr old daughter has received her first copy and is thrilled with it. Excellent magazine. Word of warning though, I do unfortunately appear to have inadvertently learned stuff too due to her constant verbal updates whilst reading it. Be warned, it could happen to you!” 🤯
Gemma Dodgson

“I love the fact that women engineers and scientists feature so prominently. I hadn’t realised this was the case when I first subscribed, and originally subscribed simply because it looked like a fun way to get a greater exposure to science, but it really stands out for me. I also love the use of proper scientific terminology because it familiarises children to this language and makes science more accessible.”
Cat

“My daughter starts asking a week before it pops through our letterbox when will it be here. Best birthday present she’s ever received.”
Nicky Doyle

“My son said “Whizz Pop Bang is the best magazine ever, I love the jokes especially”
Ella Weaver

“My son reads it cover to cover! More than once! He even refers back to back copies. (The pile on the bed is huge!)”
Ed Bickerstaffe

“Fantastic magazine and helps so much with our daughters love of science”
Tracey Cook

“My daughter loves the magazine. She is really excited every month when it arrives. She wants to be a scientist when she grows up so that she can ‘change the world’ and that says it all really!”
Anna Hodgin

“We are a home educating family and I choose not to use the discount because I believe that it is already great value for money. We (age range from 34 – 5) all get excited when Whizz Pop Bang comes through the door. It gives us the opportunity to explore things/people that we may not have heard of before in a style that all of us can understand and use as a base to explore articles further. I personally enjoy ‘Animal antics’, ‘Interview with a science hero’, ‘how stuff works’, Ten awesomely amazing’ and Sensational scientists.”
Leech family

“It is an awesome magazine. As a mum I like that you email me a supply list before the magazine arrives. All three of my children love it ages 6, 13 and 15.”
Michelle

“I’m also a Childminder so I’ve kept all the copies so they can access all the back issues when topics arise at school. I imagine that the babies I mind will look at these in the years to come as well as my grandchildren.”
Caroline Francis

“My child took a copy to school and the teacher was so delighted he said he’d buy W.P.B too! 😁”
E. Yates

“I have been very impressed with WPB. My boys love receiving their own post (in such vibrant and environmentally friendly packaging) each month and can’t wait to open it. The experiments and articles are pitched at the perfect level and inspire them to think about topics that they might not otherwise come across. I will be continuing the subscription for their little sister when she is old enough, too.”
Rebecca Wale

“Whizz Pop Bang is an excellent resource that I have recommended to several parents and teachers. My kids look forward to receiving the magazine every month, and my son is currently reading this month’s out loud to me. Please keep up the good work!”
Cathy Campbell

“I’m an archaeological scientist. I want my son to understand why I love what I do; that science can be beautiful, and awe-inspiring, and fun. Your magazine forms a central part of this nefarious propaganda machine, so … thank you!”
Chloe Duckworth

“I love the accessible feel and the range of topics covered each month. I really appreciate the advance warning emails so I can prepare for forthcoming experiments”
Jo Jenks

“Our daughter loves receiving Whizz Pop Bang looks forward to it each month. She’s excited about science and a passionate feminist so it’s great that the magazine provides role models of women in STEM. We’re also impressed with the decision to use paper envelopes rather than plastic wrappers. Thank you.”
Sarah Giles

Royal Institution logo

News on the Royal Institution Christmas lectures 2018

Prof Alice Roberts Royal Institution Christmas lectures
Prof Alice Roberts who will be answering the question ‘Who are we?’ at the Royal Institution Christmas lectures 2018

Who are we?

Where do we come from?

What does it mean to be human?

This year Prof Alice Roberts will take us on a fascinating journey for the Royal Institution of Great Britain Christmas lectures to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I?

Each one of us is unique. And yet there are many more similarities between us than differences. We share about 99.4% of our genetic sequence in common with other people. In that small genetic difference resides much of the wonderful variety we see in humans today. How do we use the similarities and differences between us to construct our individual identities?

In the 2018 CHRISTMAS LECTURES from the Royal Institution, scientist, author and TV presenter Alice Roberts will take us on a journey to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I? 

Tickets to the filming of the Christmas lectures are available through a ballot in September, open to Royal Institution Members and Patrons and UK registered schools only. To find out how to join the Ri and apply for tickets to this once in a lifetime show, visit the Ri website.

About the lectures

From our hidden similarities to a fruit fly, to the story of the emergence and global spread of our own species, to the interplay between genes and environment in creating individual differences, Alice will uncover our shared evolutionary past and ask challenging ethical questions about what the future holds.

Lecture 1 explores our amazingly beastly past, and through surprising similarities to our animal ancestors – from the bones and body plans we share with fish and horses to the genes we share with a fruit fly – we discover our true place in the biological tree of life.

Lecture 2 examines connections with our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, and traces our evolutionary journey – from a common ancestor with those apes, to the emergence of our species, Homo sapiens, and the amazing colonisation of the world by our Stone Age ancestors. What are the essential characteristics that makes us human? And how did out species become so successful?

Lecture 3 unpicks genetic variations to find out how the differences between us are created by an interplay between genes and environment, asks whether we can find evidence for natural selection and adaptation in our genomes today, and explores how our DNA may hold clues to future health and risk of disease. We can already change the genes of crops to give them traits we see as desirable, but could it be possible for humans?  And in this Brave New World, where do we draw the line?

The Lectures will be broadcast on BBC Four in December.

Alice, who is Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham, said: “The study of biology and our own evolutionary past gives us a really interesting way to understand who we are, today. I’m looking forward to sparking some young imaginations with this amazing area of science. 

“As well as providing us with knowledge about our past and present, though, new technologies can confront us with difficult decisions about what we should do in the future. 

“So I’ll also be asking some challenging questions about what identity means today, and what advances in genetics in particular might mean for us as a species.” 

what makes something fly

Take off this summer with our Sky High Science issue!

Whizz Pop Bang science magazine for kids! Sky high science

Wouldn’t it be amazing to fly like a bird? Or how do you fancy fluttering like a butterfly, or even soaring like a snake?! There are all sorts of flying phenomena to discover this issue. Have a go at making your own stunt plane, investigating different designs of straw planes and testing aerofoils. We interview Palaeontologist Liz Martin-Silverstone to ask her how on earth the giant pterosaurs were able to fly, plus we find out how drones work, and answer the question on lots of people’s minds… just how do planes fly???

Buy this issue here and fill your summer holidays with awesome science fun!! ? ✈ ?

Illustration of a peppered moth

WIN! Moth, An evolution story by Isabel Thomas

Mothnight competition to win Moth by Isabel Thomas

To celebrate #MothNight2018 we’ve got a copy of this beautiful book, MOTH, by Isabel Thomas (one of our Whizz Pop Bang writers). Written for younger children, this is the retelling of the story of the peppered moth. A true tale, and ideal introduction to natural selection and evolution for children.

“This is the story of light and dark…”

Enter by answering this question in the comment box below:

What sort of moth is this story about?

A. Salted moth

B. Sugared moth

C. Peppered moth

Enter by midnight on Sunday 17th June. By entering this competition you agree to the terms and conditions on our website. Thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing for this book.

Agnes Arber photo in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

Scientists from history

Each month we celebrate a sensational scientist from history; an eminent figure in the creation, invention or discovery of a scientific breakthrough. How many famous scientists can you name? How many of those are women? Female scientists were often forgotten or unknown, simply because they were women. And yet their work was instrumental in discovering hugely important scientific breakthroughs.

Inside Whizz Pop Bang magazine your kids will discover the historic world of science; who invented computers, who discovered the milky way and who is responsible for how we forecast the weather. We tell the story of these fascinating scientists, both male and female, and how they came to discover incredible things.

A few examples of the less well-known women we’ve featured: Lise Meitner, whose work led to the discovery of nuclear fission, astronomer Caroline Herschel and Agnes Arber, botanist and early ambassador in helping the world to recognize the amazing talent of women in science. Read the full list of sensational scientists below.

The story of Agnes Arber in Whizz Pop Bang science magazine

List of the sensational scientists featured in Whizz Pop Bang magazine:

Issue 1: Mary Anning

Issue 2: Charles Darwin

Issue 3: Maria Telkes

Issue 4: Leonardo da Vinci

Issue 5: Lise Meitner

Issue 6: Louis Pasteur

Issue 7: Rosalind Franklin

Issue 8: Antoine Lavoisier

Issue 9: Mary Somerville

Issue 10: Charles Lyell

Issue 11: Caroline Herschel

Issue 12: Jacques Cousteau

Issue 13: Grace Hopper

Issue 14: Roy Chapman Andrews

Issue 15: William Henry Perkin

Issue 16: Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Issue 17: Florence Nightingale

Issue 18: Albert Einstein

Issue 19: Gregor Mendel

Issue 20: Rachel Carson

Issue 21: Ibn al Haytham

Issue 22: Richard Feynman

Issue 23: Agnes Arber

Issue 24: Alfred Wegener

Issue 25: Jeanne Villepreux-Power

Issue 26: George de Mestral, velcro

Issue 27: Marie Curie

Issue 28: Nicolaus Copernicus

Issue 29: Hedy Lamarr

Issue 30: Archimedes

Issue 31: Anselmus De Boot

Issue 32: Joseph Bazalgette

Issue 33: Charles Darwin

Issue 34: Michael Faraday

Issue 35: Gerty Cori

To buy a back issue for just £3.75 (with free UK delivery!) visit our shop.

Nikita Hari photo

Whizz Pop Bang interviews with science heroes!

Whizz Pop Bang Interview with Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari

Each month we interview a SCIENCE HERO to find out what real scientists do in their jobs. This is where we ensure we have a real mix of male and female scientists to inspire girls and boys, and particularly showcase women in STEM roles. Breaking down gender stereotypes is an important part of Whizz Pop Bang magazine as we strive for a future of equality.

Many of the scientists we interview are happy to be contacted by readers who have their own questions, a great opportunity to chat to real scientists! We love this tweet from Electrical Engineer Nikita Hari who’s passionate about inspiring kids into science, especially girls…

Inspiring tweet from Nikita Hari electrical engineer

 

Are your kids super curious, always asking questions and exploring new ideas? Help them to nurture their natural curiosity with Whizz Pop Bang! Here’s a list of the 35 scientists we’ve interviewed to date:

Issue 1: Beccy Smith, Chocolate scientist

Issue 2: Karen Ladenheim, Robotics scientist, Stanford University

Issue 3: Lynn Whitfield, Bat ecologist

Issue 4: Dr Steve Brusatte, Palaeontologist, Edinburgh University

Issue 5: Rob Lambert, Antarctic explorer and polar scientist

Issue 6: Tim Peake, Astronaut

Issue 7: Susan Cheyne, Conservation biologist (orangutans)

Issue 8: Misha Lotto, young scientist, Blackawton Bees Project

Issue 9: Josie Campbell, Vet

Issue 10: Shane Cronin, Volcanologist (New Zealand)

Issue 11: Jennifer Andon, Entomologist

Issue 12: Dr Maddalena Bearsi, Marine biologist

Issue 13: Prof Robert Winston, Medical scientist, Imperial College

Issue 14: Sarah Shelley, Fossil hunter

Issue 15: Helen Czerski, Bubble scientist

Issue 16: Abbie Hutty, Mars Rover engineer

Issue 17: Lara Aknin, Psychology professor (gift-giving)

Issue 18: Emma Burke, Penguin aquarist

Issue 19: Ian Gilby, Primatologist, Tanzania

Issue 20: Caoimhe Doyle, Foley Artist, sound effect engineer

Issue 21: Amy Dejong, Food scientist, University of Wisconsin

Whizz Pop Bang interview with a nanotechnologist

Issue 22: Payton Barnwell, Nanotechnologist, Florida Polytechnic Uni

Issue 23: Dave Goulson, Bumblebee biologist

Issue 24: Huw James, Science adventurer

Issue 25: Alex Hildred, Maritime archaeologist

Issue 26: Cierra Martin, Seed guardian

Issue 27: Toby Gemmill, Orthopaedic vet

Issue 28: Dr Sheyna, Martian (sort of!)

Issue 29: Richard Stammers, Visual effects artist

Issue 30: Andres Ruzo, Geothermal Scientist

Issue 31: Lisa Elser, Gem cutter

Issue 32: Pratap Pullammanappallil, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Florida, USA 

Issue 33: Dr Nicola Rooney, Research Fellow in the Animal Welfare and Behaviour Group at the University of Bristol

Issue 34: Nikita Hari, Electrical Engineer

Issue 35: Barry Drust, Professor of Exercise Physiology

Whizz Pop Bang magazine has helped to inspire lots of girls and boys to want to be scientists when they grow up! To buy a back issue (for just £3.75 inc UK delivery) visit our back issues shop or you can sign up for monthly magazines by post – simply subscribe online.

Win this icon

WIN! A signed copy of The Matilda Effect by Ellie Irving

The Matilda Effect three copies

We’ve got three signed copies of The Matilda Effect to giveaway!

Matilda loves science and inventing. Her heroes are Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci and Thomas Edison, and one day she wants to be a famous inventor herself. So when she doesn’t win the school science fair, she’s devastated – especially as the judges didn’t believe she’d come up with her entry on her own. Because she’s a girl…

To enter this competition tell us what Marie Curie helped to develop, was it…
a) x-ray
b) blu-ray
c) sting ray antivenom

Answer below in the comment box ?? by midnight on 31st March 2018.

 

January’s book competition

The DNA Detectives: Catch a Thief

 

This month we have a slightly different book competition for kids to enter, to help launch a brand new storybook ‘The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief’ written by Dr Mandy Hartley. Whilst there are lots of excellent reviews for this book, they are written by parents and Mandy would love to hear what children think too. If your child loves reading and would like to be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of The DNA Detectives: To Catch a Thief enter this competition by simply writing the words “me please” in the comment box below.

Dr Hartley is a new author and is looking for children to review her fun story all about a pet thief and the kids who try to find out who has stolen the missing dogs…

When Annabelle and Harry’s beloved pet dog Milly goes missing they believe the local pet thief has struck again. They have a list of suspects and plenty of evidence but how can they prove who the thief is? Their mum works as a DNA scientist and has a laboratory in the garden. The children realise they can become “DNA Detectives” and secretly use the laboratory to analyse the evidence just like real life forensic scientists. Join them on their thrilling journey where they collect clues, analyse evidence and learn about DNA to solve this case and bring Milly home safely.

“I create stories and communicate them to children in a multi-sensory way including elements to stimulate listening, smell, taste, sight and sounds as well as their as their imagination! Where possible I include scientific experiments in my stories finding entertaining ways to explain difficult scientific concepts such as natural selection, inheritance and evolution to children.”

Dr Mandy Hartley

https://www.thelittlestorytellingcompany.co.uk/the-dna-detectives-to-catch-a-thief 

DNA Detectives book reviews
Dr Mandy Hartley and two of the reviews written by parents on Amazon

This competition to win a signed copy of The DNA Detectives to review is open until midnight on 1st February. Only open to UK residents.

Whizz Pop Bang logo round

Introducing Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi!

 

Whizz Pop Bang mini scientist Camille

How adorable is this little scientist with her super cute Mr and Mrs Marie Kiwi, complete with phosphorescent test tube! ?

“Hello, your piece on Marie Curie in Issue 27 inspired our daughter Camille, 7, to create an edible homage for a school assignment to dress up fruit and vegetables. The test tube is made from phosphorescent silicone putty.
Thanks for a fantastic magazine, and keep up the good work.”
Alan Irving

Sensational scientist Marie Curie was featured in SKELETONS (issue 27) of Whizz Pop Bang, click here to buy this magazine from our online shop for just £3.75 inc. postage.

Issue 27 Marie Curie spread